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Hi. Please tell me what the grammatical names of the underlined parts are. (I think I phrased my question correctly but not sure, though.)

Either way, it is good.

Unaware of what was behind the door, he pushed the door hard to get in.
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AnonymousUnaware of what was behind the door, he pushed the door hard to get in.
Terminology varies from country to country. I'm sure this is of no avail to you since you probably live in an English speaking country, but I'll tell you anyway that the underlined part is called a causal clause equivalent where I live.

= Because he was unaware of what was behind the door, he pushed the door hard to get in.

By the way, in this part of the world a clause always has a finite verb and, obviously, an explicit or implied subject.

CB
Comments  
"Either way" = Can be either a "connecting adverb" or an "adverb clause."

"Unaware of what was behind the door" = an "adjective clause"

I'm not sure if you want these broken down more specifically, but that is the general answer.
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 Cool Breeze's reply was promoted to an answer.
Pls can anyone give me the grammatical name of this expression unless we take the right steps well ahead of time...