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A: What hurts on/with you?

B: My belly.

Is it on or with in the above context? Are there more alternatives to express the same idea? Thanks.
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What hurts you?
What bothers you?
Marius HancuWhat hurts you?
What bothers you?

Thanks, Marius.

But if I want to express that what part of the body hurts on/with someone, how should I say it?

What (part of his body) hurts on/with the boy?

His belly.
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I'd say:

Which part of your body is aching?

Is this idiomatic?
IMO:

Which part of your body is hurting?


and I should correct my posting in the above to:

What is hurting you?
What is bothering you?


Because we're talking about now, not about what happens on a regular basis, the continuous present should be used, and not simple present.
None of this is very natural. It's very diffucult to imagine a situation in which you would say to someone "What is hurting you?"

An adult would say "Ow, my back is really aching." So you don't have to ask.

If my child says, "Mommy, mommy, it hurts!" I would say "What hurts?"

Remember that in real life, sentences don't just occur. We have conversations that take place in context.
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Grammar GeekNone of this is very natural. It's very diffucult to imagine a situation in which you would say to someone "What is hurting you?"

An adult would say "Ow, my back is really aching." So you don't have to ask.

If my child says, "Mommy, mommy, it hurts!" I would say "What hurts?"

Remember that in real life, sentences don't just occur. We have conversations that take place in context.

Thanks, GG, for your example.

If I want to know what part of the body is hurting your child, is it "What hurts on your child or with your child?"
You'd say "What's wrong with her?" or "What does the problem seem to be?"
Or you could say "Where does it hurt?"
AngliholicIf I want to know what part of the body is hurting your child, is it "What hurts on your child or with your child?"
I think you need to divorce yourself from the idea of needing to use 'on' or 'with' with the verb 'hurt', Angliholic.

Using the word 'with', you could say "What's wrong with your son?" (a very general question -- it can be asked in reference to a physical problem/illness or an emotional problem) or "What's wrong with his leg?", for example.
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