Today a colleague recommends that I answer a certain question in a certain way, and then said, "so when they ask you this question, you can give them this shpiel (that I suggested to you)".

I do not know how to spell the word "shpiel" but I think it is pronounced as the German word "Spiel". I guess from the context he meant "tactic answer", but anyone who knows this word better, please give me a clue. Thanks.
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Today a colleague recommends that I answer a certain question in a certain way, and then said, "so when they ... from the context he meant "tactic answer", but anyone who knows this word better, please give me a clue. Thanks.

It is indeed the German 'spiel'. In English usage it means a story, a line of patter, some glib explanation.

John Dean
Oxford
Today a colleague recommends that I answer a certain question ... knows this word better, please give me a clue. Thanks.

It is indeed the German 'spiel'. In English usage it means a story, a line of patter, some glib explanation.

Evidently, non-Jews use "spiel" and Jews use "shpeil". Google and you'll see examples like "Some fun bits from the purim shpeil at my shul yesterday."
I'm not sure about the "i" and "e" sequence, but when I lived on the north side of Chicago, "shpeil" was commonly heard.
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It is indeed the German 'spiel'. In English usage it means a story, a line of patter, some glib explanation.

Evidently, non-Jews use "spiel" and Jews use "shpeil". Google and you'll see examples like "Some fun bits from the purim ... about the "i" and "e" sequence, but when I lived on the north side of Chicago, "shpeil" was commonly heard.

And I meant to add (commonly heard) as a word for a sales pitch or a line of argument.
Today a colleague recommends that I answer a certain question in a certain way, and then said, "so when they ... from the context he meant "tactic answer", but anyone who knows this word better, please give me a clue. Thanks.

To me it means a prepared speech, like a sales pitch from one of those telephone marketers.
I think it is derived from Yiddish, where it may mean something different.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
It is indeed the German 'spiel'. In English usage it means a story, a line of patter, some glib explanation.

Evidently, non-Jews use "spiel" and Jews use "shpeil". Google and you'll see examples like "Some fun bits from the purim ... about the "i" and "e" sequence, but when I lived on the north side of Chicago, "shpeil" was commonly heard.

That's because, in German and in Yiddish, "spiel" is pronounced ""shpeel".

dg (domain=ccwebster)
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Today a colleague recommends that I answer a certain question ... knows this word better, please give me a clue. Thanks.

It is indeed the German 'spiel'. In English usage it means a story, a line of patter, some glib explanation.

Minor nit-pick:
"Spiel" is German and does not have the above meanings. Its cognate "shpil" is Yiddish and means what J.D. stated above and more. Both nouns are pronounced alike ("shpeel"). Any other spelling of the Yiddish "shpil" (e.g., "shpiel," "shpiehl," "schpeil," etc.) is wrong.

Reinhold (Rey) Aman, Philologist
President, The László Löwenstein Fan Club
Today a colleague recommends that I answer a certain question ... knows this word better, please give me a clue. Thanks.

To me it means a prepared speech, like a sales pitch from one of those telephone marketers. I think it is derived from Yiddish, where it may mean something different.

In German it means 'play', in the same senses as in English (what you do with a toy, and a stage production). Spiel in the sense of stage production has come to be used for any prepared speech or monologue, especially in a derogatory sense in the context of salespeople and suchlike. It's true it often sounds like Yidddish, but I'd guess this is because of the common tendency for English speakers to mispronounce German words.
Ian

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Today a colleague recommends that I answer a certain question ... knows this word better, please give me a clue. Thanks.

To me it means a prepared speech, like a sales pitch from one of those telephone marketers. I think it is derived from Yiddish, where it may mean something different.

German: spielen (v) to play, as a game or instrument. Spiel (n) game, match.

dg (domain=ccwebster)
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