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I would have to take you there.I could have to take you there.
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More context would be useful. Generally, "I would have to ~" expresses a necessity in some hypothetical situation, or in order to achieve some envisaged result, while "I could have to ~" expresses a possible necessity. To me, it is slightly questionable whether "I could have to ~" is perfectly correct English, though it would be accepted colloquially. Opinions may vary. The number of Google hits for "I could have to" is remarkably low, I would even say implausibly low. "I might/may have to" is a more common and, I would say, preferred, alternative.

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Hasibul AlamI could have to take you there.

No.

The only modal verbs that regularly occur before have to are will, would, may, and might. If I were you, I would avoid the others, e.g., can, could, should, and must.

Here are a few examples of those combinations which are more commonly seen:

I will have to go to the dentist next month.
I told Helen that I would have to go to the dentist Tuesday.
I may have to skip class tomorrow because of a dental appointment.
I might have to skip class tomorrow because of a dental appointment.

CJ

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Hasibul AlamI would have to take you there.
I could have to take you there.

Setting aside the problems with "could have to", in the general case "could" often contains the idea of "would", just as "can" often contains the idea of "will". Thus, often can = will be able to and could = would be able to.

will and would include the idea of acting on what is said.
can and could contain only the idea of the potential for acting.


For these reasons, you can say

I can speak Chinese, but I will not speak Chinese. Emotion: yes
I could speak Chinese, but I would not speak Chinese. Emotion: yes

Here you have the ability to do something, but you choose not do it.


But it makes no sense to say

I cannot speak Chinese, but I will speak Chinese. Emotion: no
I could not speak Chinese, but I would speak Chinese. Emotion: no

Here you do not have the ability to do something, so it makes no sense to say you will do it.

CJ

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