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I have two questions on two different areas of grammar.

The 1st one is asking which one of the two is right?

This is the one you love the most.

This is the one you love most.

The 2nd Q deals with the sentence below.

If you had a million dollars, what are ( the???) five things (that???) you will do with the money?

1) Can I make it "If you have a million dollars" and not "If you had a million dollars"?

2) Do I absolutely have to place "that" before "you" in the sentence above for it to be correct grammatically?

3) Can I place "the" before "five" and if I can, can it cause the meaning to differ?
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Believer
This is the one you love the most.

This is the one you love most.

These would be understood to have the same meaning. If you were to say "more," instead of "most," then only the second formation would work.

The 2nd Q deals with the sentence below.

If you had a million dollars, what are ( the???) five things (that???) you will no - should be would do with the money?

1) Can I make it "If you have a million dollars" and not "If you had a million dollars"? - If you did that, you should change "you will do" to "you are going to do"

2) Do I absolutely have to place "that" before "you" in the sentence above for it to be correct grammatically? No, you can leave it out.

3) Can I place "the" before "five" and if I can, can it cause the meaning to differ? Yes, the meaning changes. It says there are exactly five things you can do with the money. Perhaps the person was told to make a list of five things, and you are asking about the five things he has written on your list. Without the "the," you are leaving open the possibility that the person could do any number of things, and you are asking for five examples.
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Thank you so much for a very informative explanation.

So, is it safe/right to say? On the question format, you can either choose to use or not to use "the" but when you are answering the question it MUST be included. It is because in the answer, the "that" is part of a subject. Right?

Q: What is one thing (that) you will you do with the money?

A: The one thing THAT I will do with my money is donate to an charitable organization.

Should the colored word be "part" or "a part"? Instinctively, I feel that it should be "part."
Not quite. If I respond saying "the one thing," I'm telling that it's the ONLY thing I will do.

I would answer "One thing I'll do (is whatever)." I could follow up with "and then I'd buy my mom and dad a new house, and then I'd take a trip, and then I'd just see what made sense after that."

But if I said "The one thing I'll do is make a donation," that implies that all of my money is going there - it's the ONLY I'll do.

"That" is a funny word - it's optional so much of the time. And it's optional here too.
Thank you. Your answer makes very good sense, but if you and I are sitting on (around???) a table and having this conversation, I would include the "the" in front of "one thing" in my response because I am mentioning the one thing that has been mentioned in the question. Right? The case of a prior mentioning.

How about if a teacher gave out a sheet and in it, there was a question like this, how would you answer?

One or two?

Q: If you had a milliion dollars, what are three things you would you do with it?

1. Three things that I would do with it are buy a house, donate some to an organization and buy a box of chocolate with what's left.

2. The three things that I would do with it are buy a house, donate some to an organization and buy a box of chocolate with what's left over.

Additional Qs:

1. a box of chocolate or a box of chocolates?

2. sitting on a table or sitting around a table?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
For the first one, 1.

Additional Qs:
1. if the box is made out of chocolate, the earlier. If you're talking about a box filled with chocolates, the latter.

2. If you're sitting on top of the table, then the earlier. If you're sitting around it then, the latter.

Hmm, what strange questions.