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Foot Hockey is played using a bald tennis ball.

Q1) Is the sentence above correct English?

Q2) What is the implied subject of "using"?

I would like to know what is the implied subject of "using".
The implied subject is Foot Hockey? or players?

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Opinions about this may vary. I would say that "using" in this case is verging towards a preposition (like "with"), and that the sense of an implied subject is not strong in our minds.

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GPYGPY

Then don't you think the implied subject of "using" is "players"?

fire1

Foot Hockey is played (by) using a bald tennis ball. This is a passive sentence which often doesn't show the implied subject. For instance: The house was broken into in the middle of the night according to the police.

Q1) Is the sentence above correct English? Yes with "by".

Q2) What is the implied subject of "using"? Players

I would like to know what is the implied subject of "using".
The implied subject is Foot Hockey? or players?

fire1Then don't you think the implied subject of "using" is "players"?

Not clearly, no (of course, we know separately from general knowledge that "players use a ball"). Compare these:

a) birds use twigs to make their nests -> nests are made using twigs
b) birds gather twigs to make their nests -> nests are made gathering twigs

You can see that (a) works but (b) does not (at least, not well). In my opinion, this is because "using", in this type of usage, has a special preposition-like nature, and this weakens the necessity for it to have a clear implied subject.

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GPYa) nests are made using twigs

Then at least in sentence a, is it correct to think the implied subject of "using" is "birds"?

fire1
GPYa) nests are made using twigs

Then at least in sentence a, is it correct to think the implied subject of "using" is "birds"?

To me, it seems similar to the original sentence in this respect. In other words, "using" seems to mean something more like "with" or "from", rather than being strongly associated with an implied subject. Also, as the examples in my previous post demonstrate, there does not seem to be any general process in English whereby "nests are made verb-ing twigs" can work (or work well), suggesting that "using" is a special case.

Of course, assuming we know that the general topic is birds, we do also understand that birds use twigs to make nests. However, the same is true in the case of "nests are made with twigs", so this understanding does not need to be based on supplying an implied subject.

Opinions may vary.