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I found the following sentence on Youtube. Though I could understand what they say, I have no idea about the associated grammar points. I mean, though it seems as though it is a perfect participle clause, I'm not precisely sure about it. Therefore, please someone let me know which type of constructions this is. In addition, please give me a web link to study this further.


Given the millions of billions of earth-like planets, life elsewhere in the universe without a doubt does exist.


Reference:-

Please note that time of the video is included in following url.

https://youtu.be/EVBCLAaflaw?t=237



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Given the millions of billions of earth-like planets, life elsewhere in the universe without a doubt does exist.

Given here is an idiomatic term that means the speaker will not dispute or disagree with what is then said.

eg Given that Tom loves Mary, he should marry her.

eg Given that global wrming is a reality, we are all doomed.

A similar term is 'granted that'.

Clive

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dileepaa perfect participle clause

Close, but no cigar. Emotion: smile

It's a past participle clause.

(Perfect participle clauses start with "having".)

Try this link. It has just about everything you'll need.

http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org.cn/ar/grammar/intermediate-to-upper-intermediate/participle-clauses?page=46

CJ

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Given the millions of billions of earth-like planets, life elsewhere in the universe without a doubt does exist.


No, it's not a participial clause, though this "given" has arisen by conversion from the past participle verb of the same shape.

It's actually a preposition here, interpreted as "taking into account", "in view of", or just "considering" (also a prep here).

It's classified as a preposition, not a clause, because there is no understood subject.

The whole "given the millions of billions of earth-like planets" functions as an adjunct.

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BillJIt's classified as a preposition, not a clause, because there is no understood subject.

Aha. I thought that's where you were going with this, but I didn't see the whole post until now.

CJ

Thank you very much for the answer.

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Thank you very much for the answer.

Thank you very much for the answer.