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They could be playing gambling or soccer betting and it could make them worst. In fact, today, no matter poor or rich people, millions lured into gambling and have and found themselves ensnared by a vicious debt

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apple hat 912playing gambling
apple hat 912and it could make them worst

it could make it worse for them (is what, I'm guessing, you want to say)

apple hat 912In fact, today, no matter poor or rich people, millions lured into gambling and have and found themselves ensnared by a vicious debt

In fact, today, no matter if they're poor or rich, millions of people get lured into gambling and find themselves ensnared by vicious debt. (debt is a mass noun, like money, sugar, flour.)


They could be gambling or betting on sports, and it could make it worse for them. In fact, today, no matter if they're poor or rich, millions of people get lured into gambling and find themselves ensnared by vicious debt.

There is a lot wrong.

"Playing gambling" does not work. You could simply say "gambling", or you could mention one specific form, like "playing poker" or "playing the slots".

"Soccer betting" is not exactly wrong, but it sounds awkward to this American. I would have said "betting on soccer", except the Brits call it football (it's complicated), and Americans, who call it soccer, would more iconically bet on some less socialist sport, like boxing. Maybe "betting on sports" is safest, but I believe the Brits make that "betting on sport".

You need a comma before a coordinating conjunction joining two independent clauses ("betting, and").

Your use of "could" seems wrong, and I don't know what you are trying to say with the whole first sentence. "It could make them worst" does not work if you mean that it damages them. It should be "make them worse", but even that does not make much sense.

My guess for the first sentence is "Whether it's playing poker or betting on sports, gambling ruins lives."

"In fact" sets up a surprising fact in consequence of what has just been said. There is no such fact here.

"No matter poor or rich people" is ungrammatical, and the order "rich or poor" is more natural.

Millions have been lured into gambling.

"And have and found themselves ensnared by a vicious debt" has an extra "and" in it, a cut-and-paste error, I suppose. The wording is a bit odd, but I can't call it wrong.

My guess for the second sentence is "Today, millions of people, rich and poor alike, have been lured into gambling and have found themselves ensnared by a vicious debt."