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My school (I live in Brazil), which was supposed to be a good one, posted in their website "What is to be a brazilian teenager", referring to some project other students had done. It's a weird thing to say, and it seems wrong. Wouldn't it be more correct to say "What it is to be a brazilian tennager".
I mean, in English, sentences have got to have a subject. In the sentence "What is to be a brazilian teenager", "what" is a question word, so it can't be the subject, right? "Is" is the verb, "to be" is another verb, and "a brazilian teenager" is the complement. I see no subject. Also, I'm 100% certain that the correct thing to say is: "What is it to be a brazilian teenager?", but I'm not really sure how it goes with affirmative sentences. Does "what" become the subject of the sentence, or you have to put an "it" to make the sentence gramatically correct? Because you don't say "is raining", you say "it's raining".
To some up, is it:
1) What is to be a brazilian teenager.
OR
2) What it is to be a brazilian teenager.
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Hi,

Welcome to the Forum.

Yes, you're right.

What it is to be a Brazilian teenager.

Clive
Comments  
Thanks for the answer.