+0
Hi,

Would you break down the underlined part? Since I am a bit confused with this "but as my teacher" expression, (what kind of "as" is this?) I am unable to understand the sentence.

I didn't see my sessions as the sort of thing that one would want to advertise, but as my teacher liked to say, "I guess it takes all kinds."

Thank you,

M
+0
It is a conjunction.

(without antecedent) in the degree, manner, etc., of or that: She's good as gold. Do as we do.
Comments  
The person mentioned in your sentence refers to something that her/his teacher said once. So the as is a reference.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
 Mister Micawber's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thank you for the reply.

Although I don't want to bother you, I still don't get the point of the sentence. I think I understood the meaning of this "as" but I don't know why there's "but" here. I mean:

I didn't see my sessions as the sort of thing that one would want to advertise, as my teacher liked to say, "I guess it takes all kinds."

seems grammatically good enough. (And I still don't understand the meaning fully.)

Will you break down the second half part?

Thank you,

M
You need 'but' because it is a contrary viewpoint following.

I didn't see my sessions as the sort of thing that one would want to advertise. However, [the same] as my teacher liked to say, "I guess it takes all kinds."-- The teacher's saying means that some other kinds of people might want to advertise such sessions.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
OK, great! many thanks.Emotion: big smile

M