+0
He was once given to scrambling with his hands and sprawling in his sleep;and ever since she has him swaddled up in blankets.
What is the meaning of He was once given
Thanks
1 2
Comments  
There was a time when he did this. He used to do this.
Does the the structure of Be + Given + to + sth mean to be used to sth?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
No. I think you mean "To be accustomed to something." To be "used to something" means that.

I think the confusion here is that you can be accustomed to doing something, and you can be accostomed to experiencing something.

He was accustomed to fly off the handle at the least provocation.

He was accustomed to being awakened every morning at 3:15 AM by the express train to New York rumbling by his house and blowing its whistle for the crossing a mile down the road.

"To be given to something" is used only for the first type (doing something), and not for the second type (experiencing something.)

He was given to flying off the handle at the least provocation.

Not, He was given to his wife's habit of snoring.
In addition to the above distinction, there's also this:

There's a tendency to use "given to" as a pejorative, that is, referring to a bad habit.

"Accustomed to" could go either way.
AvangiHe was accustomed to fly off the handle at the least provocation.
Shouldn't it be flying off in this case?

I got the point thanks for your answer.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
But a question.
Which Does it mean :"He was used to scrambling ... ." OR" He used to scramble... ."?
I myself think the first is intention.
Hi Coloraday,

We're speaking of habitual behavior here. There are various ways to express it. Between your two suggestions, I see no significant difference in meaning.

Similarly, in your earlier question, the infinitive and the present participle are in most cases interchangeable.

Best wishes, - A. Emotion: smile
coloraday
AvangiHe was accustomed to fly off the handle at the least provocation.
Shouldn't it be flying off in this case?
We must be careful to keep track of when "to" is used as an infinitive marker and when it's used as a preposition.

"Accustomed to" / "used to" are using "to" as a preposition.

I like pizza. I like eating pizza. I like to eat pizza.

I like to take a shower every day. I like taking a shower every day.

"Like" doesn't require "to" as a preposition. In these examples, "to" is used as the infinitive marker.

I'm accustomed to taking a shower every day. I'm used to taking a shower every day.

Here the "to" is used as a preposition. Can we use the infinitive instead of the gerund?

I'm accustomed to take a shower every day. I'm used to take a shower every day.

Surely, the second one doesn't work.

I think the first one is okay; you have your doubts.

Note that we don't use two "to's." Which one did we skip?
(The infinitive marker is sometimes skipped. We say we're using "the bare infinitive.")
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more