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Hello , Which one is correct?
1. What grade are you in?
or
2. Which grade are you in?

Both correct? Both mean the same?

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In everyday English both are used, and they mean the same. Formally, (2) is better; this is because the choice is from a defined set of things. Contrast e.g. "What explanation could there be?", where the choice of potential explanations is open-ended.

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Can you answer both of them?

1. What grade are you in?
or
2. Which grade are you in?

?

sunny123

Can you answer both of them?

1. What grade are you in?
or
2. Which grade are you in?

?

I'm not sure I understand what you are asking. Both questions have the same answer. The answer is whatever grade you are in, e.g. fifth, tenth, or whatever. (I am assuming that the context is school years. "grade" is a term used the US and some other countries, but not in the UK. Here we would ask "What/Which year are you in?".)

OK, thank you GPY. But I want you answer these questions if you want to give them full answers.

A: What year are you in?

B: I'm in year three.

correct?

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Right, to answer with a full sentence:

A: Which/What year are you in?
B: I'm in year three.

A: Which/What grade are you in?
B: I'm in the third grade.

Remember that "Which" is more proper, as I mentioned.

‘Which’ is correct

In which grade are you
Which grade are you in

Which one is correct?

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Cham78Which one is correct?

They are both wrong. There is no ending punctuation mark.