It's not clear to me if this is a Vocabulary or Grammar forum question...

I'm organizing some media with a rule that conjunctions, prepositions, and articles in titles should begin with a lowercase letter. However, there are two titles for which I can't identify the parts of the speech of a word to determine what case the initial letter of that word should be.

The titles with the problematic word in all uppercase are:

* Everything THAT I'm Not

* Que er AS Folk

Obviously, these are not complete sentences, so I made them into hypothetical full sentences to resolve what parts of speech the words are:

* That is everything that I am not.

* There's nothing so que er as folk. (see there's nowt so qu eer as folk )

In the first sentence, "that" seems to be a "subordinating conjunction" considering the information at What Is a Conjunction? and therefore the word should begin with a lowercase letter. However, that looks kind of odd (i.e., Everything that I'm Not), so I'm not sure.

On the other hand, Dictionary.com's definition 4 for the pronoun form of "that" has a sentence that seems to match the form above (i.e., "the horse that he bought" or noun +"that"+verb or "everything that I am") though I don't understand the definition, so I can't be sure if "that" is a pronoun either. If so, "that" would at least look right since it would be uppercase then, so I'm leaning toward this.

Regarding "Queer AS Folk", either form of "as" (or "As") looks correct to me, so I'm even more confused here. I seem to have a prepositional phrase ("as folk" functioning as an adverb) (see What is a Preposition? ), so "as" would be a lowercased preposition. Unfortunately, if I look at Dictionary.com's definition for "as" , the first definition seems to match this phrase best and indicates that "as" is an adverb that should be uppercased.

Given the above, I'm wondering if anyone could point me to the correct parts of speech as used here and maybe the correct definitions at Dictionary.com for future reference.
In your two titles, that is a relative pronoun and as is a conjunction.

4. that: (used as the subject or object of a relative clause, especially one defining or restricting the antecedent, sometimes replaceable by who, whom, or which ): the horse that he bought.

6. as: (without antecedent) in the degree, manner, etc., of or that: She's good as gold. Do as we do.
Thanks for the help! That answers the questions.

I read up on "relative pronoun" at several places. Wikipedia helped clear up how they work with a good example.

I'm not sure how I missed that definition for "as". It fits perfectly. The phrase seemed like a simile and that definition has a clear simile as an example sentence.