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"What qualities and requirements do/does a potential multilingual person need to meet?"

I have no idea, what rule applies to this particular case because I have been told by two native speakers different things unless I am mistaken. Could you please help me a bit and provide me with an explanation?

Thank you in advance.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
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TheEnglishTeacherChanging the question into an answer works when you are determining "who" vs "whom." It does not work for determining subject/verb agreement.
I am afraid it does.

John reads books. - What does John like? (What do John like?)
I am reading a book. - What am I reading? (What is me reading?)
AlpheccaStarsWhat kinds of people do he like to meet?
Checkmate.

It seems the original sentence was nothing but an evil grammatical illusion, and I fell right into its trap. Emotion: embarrassed
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Aspara Gus Marold: So what is the conclusion, please? Aspara GusThat's up for you to decide, Marold. Often volunteers disagree with one another on a certain subject, and that's when the OP has to make up his own mind using all of the information offered. Which explanation makes the most sense to you?
There are indeed certain things in English about which even experienced teachers and writers disagree; people who ask questions here have to decide for themselves which form to use.

This is not one of those situations. In English, as in many other Indo-European languages, the grammatical subject of the verb does not miraculously change if an affirmative statemnt is changed into a question form. What Alphecca Stars wrote was what any reputable writer on grammar, prescriptive or descriptive, will confirm.
I realize that now, fivejedjon. Emotion: smile
I had not read your previous post when I wrote my last one. I'll let my post stand (nothing personal - your responses are normally sound), but I think it's important to leave no doubts in the OP's mind.
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Thank you very much for all your opinions of this, maybe a bit tricky, sentence.

In most cases, more than one write answers my question and therefore I can draw a conclusion whether the statements are contradictory or coincident. Most of the time I have no doubts about some teachers' opinions because if these teachers are, as a matter of fact, reputable, then their views are always valid for me.Emotion: smile

But this was an unusual and exceptional case, as nearly all the time the writers are in agreement with each other.Emotion: smile
MaroldIn most cases, more than one write answers my question and therefore I can draw a conclusion whether the statements are contradictory or coincident. Most of the time I have no doubts about some teachers' opinions because if these teachers are, as a matter of fact, reputable, then their views are always valid for me.
Hi Marold;
Even the most experienced teachers will occasionally misread a passage. No one is infallible; although some are more fallible than others. Emotion: wink
AlpheccaStarsNo one is infallible; although some are more fallible than others.
You've entirely summed it up! Emotion: wink
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
RandomGuyAll evidence points to plural. Does is wrong.

This kid may not have been the sharpest arrow in the quiver, but he wasn't this dense. The spectacular blunder above was the result of something very similar to what psychologists call 'motivated reasoning', only the child was motivated not by a need to justify the innocent (if idiotic) conflation of the default position of the subject (before the verb) with a syntactic rule without exception, as "TheEnglishTeacher" apparently was, but by an irrational hatred of women. In his effort to humiliate the lady the child only humiliated himself, and paid dearly for it for years to come. True story!