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"The literary heritage

Ideas about English change over time, but two themes endure. One of these is about a ‘heritage’ of literary texts that no pupil should leave school without reading. We want to consider what ‘heritage’ means in our multi-ethnic, multicultural society and in a context where the boundaries between literary and non-literary texts are increasingly blurred in both print and electronic media. What should a reading heritage be for pupils in 2015? "

http://www.qca.org.uk/qca_5644.aspx

Any thoughts on the final question in that paragraph?
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Comments  
An interesting question. The range of choice is very, very vast.

Who knows, perhaps people's blogs gain some heritage and they are the canon of 21st century.
Yes, Zerox, it would be interesting to see certain blogs being used as useful reading heritage. I
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Is Shakespeare influential? And if so, why? I suspect he's only influential because they made him look influential, as it always happens way too often in too many other cases.
Are some important authors almost unknown? And if so, why? I suspect they are not influential because they made them look not important, as it always happens way too often in too many other cases.
Answer to your question:
What should a reading heritage be for pupils in 2015?

There's no answer to that question, because it's a stupid question. Pupils, irisis, eyelashes, students, or whatever you want to call them, are NOT in school to read stupid books. I thought that was clear enough. Everyone knows school is meant to be a place where people play with their cellphones, play tricks on the teachers, and smoke weed in the bathroom. Who the hell reads books anymore in school, in 2015?
Anonymous

a ‘heritage’ of literary texts that no pupil should leave school without reading.

You might as well devise a checklist of mathematical formulae that no pupil should leave school without "reading".

MrP
MrPedantic
Anonymous

a ‘heritage’ of literary texts that no pupil should leave school without reading.

You might as well devise a checklist of mathematical formulae that no pupil should leave school without "reading".

MrP

Why do you say that? Not sure I understand.

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The idea that reading a certain number of texts will, somehow, provide a 16- or 18-year-old with something called a "literary heritage" is as desperate as suggesting that reading through a certain number of formulae will lead to an understanding of mathematics.
but two themes endure
Curiously, the writer doesn't seem to mention the 2nd theme that endures.

MrP
< The idea that reading a certain number of texts will, somehow, provide a 16- or 18-year-old with something called a "literary heritage" is as desperate as suggesting that reading through a certain number of formulae will lead to an understanding of mathematics. >

I'm sure what is meant is the beginnings of a literary heritage, don't you think i?

And what should be the purpose of getting students to read certain authors at school?
I know the main question has not been answered satisfactorily yet, but there is another interesting, related, question later in that text:

The spoken word

English has multiple roles in the communication of knowledge, power and influence in the global economy, and the effective use of talk is key to many of them. Pupils need to be able to discuss and debate ideas with a wide range of other speakers, not just in their local area but also internationally. Do we need to give space in English lessons for talk to be taught more systematically? Just as it is important to develop pupils’ skills as speakers, so too they need to learn more about ways of listening critically and responsively. Can we envisage a ‘heritage’ of spoken texts comparable to the canon of written ones?

Any thoughts?
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