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Hello my friends,
I would like to share a sentence which I saw on the Internet, with you.

" I am going to give you a card with a few questions on it about a specific topic. "

According to my opinion,
There is no word before "about", which "about" can refer to. So, "About a specific topic" is an adverbial prepositional phrase here.
In addition to that,
Even if it does not sound natural, we can say: "I am going to give you a card, about a specific topic, with a few questions on it." or "About a specific topic, I am going to give you a card with a few questions on it."

Do you agree with me?

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JawelAbout a specific topic" is an adverbial prepositional phrase here.

No. It is a phrase that modifies the noun "questions."

This is a clearer version of the sentence.

I am going to give you a card on which are written a few questions about a specific topic.

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Comments  

The questions are about a specific topic.

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"give you a card with a few questions on it, about a specific topic"
or
"give you a card with a few questions on it and about a specific topic"
or
"give you a card with a few questions on it that/which are about a specific topic"
Okay for me. They are completely correct, I think.
When you just say "give you a card with a few questions on it about a specific topic",
"about a specific topic" can not refer to a whole phrase, I think..

If it was possible,
In the following sentence, "About religions" would refer to "the book on the table".
But I think it is impossible..

"We are talking about ideas in the book on the table about religions."

 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.

But normally we know that prepositions can refer to the last noun or the main verb(as an adverbial prepositional phrase).

But now, there is no relative clause(with a few questions on it WHICH ARE about a specific topic is OK).

How can it be possible? or It is an exceptional case? "noun + preposition + it + preposition" ?

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Jawel"We are talking about ideas in the book on the table about religions."

That is a very awkward phrasing.

The problem is that there are three ideas, and you attempt to mash them together into a single simple sentence. The result is muddled communication.

The key to clear writing is to understand the ideas you are trying to communicate, and map them clearly into sentences. Your ideas are: 1) the book is on the table 2) the book is about religions 3) we are talking about the ideas in the book

Are the ideas of equal weight? Or is one idea the most important? Here are some possible mappings:

We are talking about ideas in the book about religions. You can find the book on the table.  
The book on the table is about religions. We are talking about the ideas in that book.
We are talking about ideas in the book (the one on the table) about religions.

I know it is wrong. I just want to explain you why I am thinking the first example is weird.

How can a preposition refer to a different noun phrase without any relative clause?

Normally to do it, you must have a relative clause.

JawelHow can a preposition refer to a different noun phrase without any relative clause?

It just can.

English is not a computer language with rigid unbreakable rules for syntax. (e.g. A prepositional phrase must always, without exception, directly follow the noun it modifies.) It is a natural language, where you often have to use your human power of judgement to determine the meaningful relationships among the lexical elements, especially when you are reading text from a not-so-skillful writer.

That is why computers have a lot of problems translating and "understanding" natural language. There are rules, and then there are myriads of exceptions.

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I agree with you but you should be considerate to us, because we are not familiar to the language, which is why we always want to have some rules to build an English sentence. When there are not any rules, we start to think about how to solve that problem now..

But I think, I solved that problem.

Do you think that these examples are correct?

1-) Did you see the title below about the army?(About the army is referring to "the title". But there is "below" between them.)

2-) I am sorry because the topic about you inside the house is not a good thing.
"inside the house" is referring to "the topic", but there is "you" between them. Is it a problem?

I think it is not problem because a preposition can not refer to a relative pronoun.

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