What situation can the subject and a verb be omitted in?

eg1.

A: It is sunny every day in Hawaii.

B: It is sunny pretty often, but certainly not every day.

-Are "It is sunny pretty often, but it is certainly not sunny every day." and B above same?

eg2.

A: Doesn't everyone drive TOYOTA's car in Japan?

B: They're popular, but not everyone drives one.

-What is the difference between "They're popular, but everyone doesn't drive one." and B above?

And are these correct sentences?

1. I like dogs but really not I like chihuahuas.

2. I like dogs but really not chihuahuas.

3. I like dogs but don't really like chihuahuas.

4. I like dogs except(ing)/outside chihuahuas.

5. I felt bule yesterday, but I'm fine now.

6. I felt bule yesterday, but being fine now.

7. I felt bule yesterday, and still bule now.

8. I turned off the airconditioner a while ago but it is still cool.

9. I turned of the airconditioner a while ago but still being cool.

I ask so many questions, but I would appreciate it if you could help me.
1 2
It is sunny pretty often, but certainly not every day.

-Are "It is sunny pretty often, but it is certainly not sunny every day." and B above same?-- Yes

A: Doesn't everyone drive a Toyota in Japan?

B: They're popular, but not everyone drives one.

-What is the difference between "They're popular, but everyone doesn't drive one." and B above?-- No difference.

These are OK:

2. I like dogs but really not chihuahuas.

3. I like dogs but don't really like chihuahuas.

5. I felt blue yesterday, but I'm fine now.

8. I turned off the air-conditioner a while ago but it is still cool.
Thank you very much for your answer!

If I would like to say "a Toyota" of plural, does it become "Toyotas"? "Don't all of Japanese drive Toyotas?"

Basically is it okay to omit a subject and a verb when the sentence has the same subject?

---

1. It is quite hot today and it is humid.

2. It is cool today, even though it is the summer.

3. It is cool today in spite of the summer. (Is this sentence correct?)

I somehow think the bold words above can't be omitted, but is it right?

Can the word, being, be replaced with those it is?
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If I would like to say "a Toyota" of plural, does it become "Toyotas"? "Don't all (of the) Japanese drive Toyotas?"-- Yes, that's right.

Basically is it okay to omit a subject and a verb when the sentence has the same subject?-- Yes, if the verb is the same also.

---

1. It is quite hot today, and it is humid.

2. It is cool today, even though it is summer.

3. (X) It is cool today in spite of the summer. (Is this sentence correct?-- No. 'It's cool today in spite of the forecast.' 'It's cool today in spite its being summer'. [Please don't ask me why!] )

I somehow think the bold words above can't be omitted, but is it right?-- Yes

Can the word, being, be replaced with those it is?-- Only in my alternenative to #3.
Thank you for answer very much!

This question doesn't connect this topic, but I just wondered. Are all of the following correct?

And would it be wrong to use "are" instead of "is" of/about the first sentence?

All American food is pretty big.

All you need is not to oversleep.

All of American foods are pretty big.

---

"1. It is quite hot today, and it is humid."

Concerning this sentence if the word "today" isn't there, also "it is" isn't necessary, isn't it?

I see. I don't ask you why. Emotion: big smile

Is the sentence "It is cool today in spite of the summer." grammatically correct, but just unnatural...?
These are correct:

All American food is pretty big.-- You cannot use 'are': 'food' is uncountable.

All you need is not to oversleep.

All American food servings are pretty big.

---

"1. It is quite hot today, and it is humid."

Concerning this sentence if the word "today" isn't there, also "it is" isn't necessary, isn't it?-- You don't need 'it is' in either case: 'It's quite hot today and humid.'

Is the sentence "It is cool today in spite of the summer." grammatically correct, but just unnatural...?-- It seems to have semantic problems. I have looked and looked at these 3 sentences, but I cannot tell you why the first is strange or wrong and the other two are quite normal:

It is cool today in spite of the summer.

It is cool today in spite of the sunshine.

It is cool today in spite of the fact that it's summer.

Maybe a smarter member will come along.
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Thank you for your explanation again!

I right now thought but would it be also correct to say "All American foods are pretty big."?

Both "It's quite hot today and humid" and "It's quite hot today and it's humid" are correct? Emotion: smile

I am so glad you tried for me to find why the first sentence is strange!

The unnatural phrases that you don't explain why, they are just not used generally, exist in any languages, I believe.
I right now thought but would it be also correct to say "All American foods are pretty big."?-- No, because the less common plural ('foods') is used in nutritional and culinary contexts for 'types of food', not meals or servings; therefore 'big' carries no reasonable meaning. 'All American foods are unhealthy' would make sense (though it is not true).

Both "It's quite hot today and humid" and "It's quite hot today and it's humid" are correct? Emotion: smile-- Yes. Of course, the expected is actually 'It's quite hot and humid today.'
Thank you very much for your explanation. I probably understand!

'All American foods are unhealthy' for a nutritional way, right?:)

Well, how to use the word, foods, in a culinary way?

I am sorry to bother you but I would do appreciate it if you could answer again.
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