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" The trouble is I find most forms of exercise so tedious."

from http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/tedious



I don't understand the structure of the sentence.

If that is changed like ->The trouble I find is most forms of exercise so tedious.



Is the order 'I find' and 'is' changed to accentuate 'The trouble' ?



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moon7296Is the order 'I find' and 'is' changed to accentuate 'The trouble' ?
No. Sometimes the pronoun "that" is omitted.

The trouble is that I find most forms of exercise so tedious.
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AlpheccaStarsNo. Sometimes the pronoun "that" is omitted.

The trouble is that I find most forms of exercise so tedious.
Hi Moon & A-S

That is a conjunction in the sentence.

CB
hI^^

Thank you for your answer.

I have a question.

Is 'that' a conjuction? /

Can it be omitted then? /

Can conjuction be taken out of a sentence? /
Hi;

The relative pronouns are that, who, whom, whose, which, where, when, and why. They are used to join clauses to make a complex sentence.

The relative pronoun (that) is sometimes omitted when the whole clause is the object of the verb.

You know I like George. (You know that I like George.)
He discovered he was lost. (He discovered that he was lost.)

--------

He knows I'm going. (He knows that I'm going.)

The omitted pronoun is always assumed to be that, which, or who.
Other relative pronouns cannot be omitted: (see the sentence above)
He knows when I'm going.

He knows where I'm going.
He knows why I'm going.

I know I ate. (I know that I ate.)

I know what I ate.

The relative pronouns (that, who, which) can sometimes be omitted,
if the clause directly follows the noun it modifies.

That girl, who used to work with me, won the lottery. (who cannot be omitted, because it is the subject of "used to")

The girl I used to work with won the lottery. (The girl who I used to work with won the lottery)

The dress I just bought is at the cleaners. (The dress which/that I just bought is at the cleaners. )
George is the guy I like. (George is the guy who I like.)
That was the best pie I've ever eaten. (That was the best pie that I've ever eaten.)
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Our grammatical terminology - and indeed the parts of speech I can find in the Random House Unabridged Dictionary as well - are somewhat different.
AlpheccaStarsThe relative pronouns are that, who, whom, whose, which, where, when, and why.
I have never seen anyone consider which, where, when and why relative pronouns even though where can often be used instead of in which: This is the village in which/where he lives.
AlpheccaStarsThe relative pronoun (that) is sometimes omitted when the whole clause is the object of the verb.

You know I like George. (You know that I like George.)
He discovered he was lost. (He discovered that he was lost.)
--------
He knows I'm going. (He knows that I'm going.)

The sentences are fine but that is a conjunction in them. It cannot possibly be a relative pronoun as it has no antecedent!
AlpheccaStarsThe omitted pronoun is always assumed to be that, which, or who.
It can also be whom: The man [that/who/whom] I met there said nothing about it.
Re omission of that, see When the word "that" is optional and when not?

CB
CB: I used Purdue University's writing site for information.
Here is their reference on "relative pronouns"

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/645/1 /

You are technically correct in differentiating the relative pronoun "that" and the conjunction "that". A relative pronoun can be used as a conjunction.

I was also troubled by the identity of "that " for a long time, and still do from time to time depending on where and how "that" is used in the context.


Right or wrong, this is my opinion.

I believe [that] the role and identity morph with context. - it's a relative pronoun

I find it diffiuclt to believe [that] John, with his socical and financial stature, would drop everything to become a pastor. It's a subordinate conjunction. And I would love to hear an expert's critique.


Here is an interesting piece that I find while browsing the net, and I think there are relative pronouns and conjunctions among all the [that's] in this article:


Barack Obama strongly supports keeping abortion legal

"I think that most Americans recognize that this is a profoundly difficult issue for the women and families who make these decisions. They don't make them casually. And I trust women to make these decisions, in conjunction with their doctors and their families and their clergy, and I think that's where most Americans are."

link (quote)

"This is a difficult moral issue. And one of the things that I believe is that to pretend that it's not a moral issue is a mistake. I think that people wrestle with this issue deeply. My belief is simply that women are in the best position to make that very difficult moral decision."


Just my passing two cents...Emotion: smile

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AlpheccaStarsCB: I used Purdue University's writing site for information.
As I said, I have never seen when, why etc. considered relative pronouns, but there seem to be many ways to analyze language.

CB
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