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What with talent and effort, he finally succeed.
What with talent and what with effort, he finally succeed.

Hi,
Do both of the above sound right and mean about the same to you? Thanks.

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Comments  
Hi, Anglihilic. I can't remember hearing it this way. In the first one, I usually hear the main clause first. In the second one, I've never head the "what with" repeated. - A.
No.

There are like 2 subjects.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I know! Try "What with talent and with effort, he finally succeed."
What with talent and with effort, he finally succeed."

It should be succeeded.
The sentence feels incomplete though.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Yoong LiatIt should be succeeded
Hi, Yoong. I can't believe I did that. All those danged letters! Thanks for catching it. - A.

Anyway, if you insist on putting the prepositional phrase first, I think it sounds better without the "what." I can't explain why it bothers me. Maybe tomorrow.
AvangiAnyway, if you insist on putting the prepositional phrase first, I think it sounds better without the "what." I can't explain why it bothers me.
No, I'm not in favour of the presence of 'what'. I agree with you that iit is better without it.

What I am more interested is in going after minor errors. I hope I do not irritate you with such triviallities.
Yoong Liat
AvangiAnyway, if you insist on putting the prepositional phrase first, I think it sounds better without the "what." I can't explain why it bothers me.
No, I'm not in favour of the presence of 'what'. I agree with you that iit is better without it.
What I am more interested in is is in going after minor errors. I hope I do not irritate you with such triviallities.

Emotion: smile
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