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Hi,

'The average illegal patient is 25 years old giving birth to her second anchor baby.'

Is 'giving birth to her second anchor baby' a present particple phrase?

Secondly, to be grammatically correct, does it need to have a comma separating it from the sentence?

'The average illegal patient is 25 years old, giving birth to her second anchor baby.'

Thirdly, Is it even better to write it like this as I understood that the phrase should generally come straight after the noun (patient)?

'The average illegal patient, giving birth to her second anchor baby, is 25 years old

Finally, is it best written like this?

'The average illegal patient is 25 years old AND IS giving birth to her second anchor baby.'

Finally, 'IS 25 years old' is this an appositive? It could also be separated from the noun by commas as it is non essential information, correct?

Thanks for your help
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Comments  (Page 2) 
I have nothing to contribute to the grammar discussion, but the phrase "illegal patient" bothers me. I realize that people use to term "illegal" as a quick way to refer to a person who is in the country illegally, or without proper documentation, but I don't like it -- in my mind, an action can be illegal, but not a person. However, even if you accept the current use of "illegal" as applied to people, "illegal patient" sounds as if the person is forbidden by law from being a patient. Is that what you mean to say?
khoff a quick way to refer to a person who is in the country illegally, or without proper documentation
If we are to prohibit the term "illegal" on humanitarian grounds, or because of common decency or political correctness; then surely we must prohibit "anchor baby," which to my mind is a far more offensive and degrading term. While clearly nothing illegal is being done, the implied accusation cuts far deeper.

(Doesn't this belong in another forum?)

- A.
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Hi guys,
What's an 'anchor baby'? I haven't heard this expression.

Clive
Hi Clive,

It deals with the fact that anyone born in the US is a citizen thereof. Pregnant mothers are sometimes accused of travelling to the US to bear the child, thereby getting a foot in the door, so to speak. I believe the mother may then take advantage of laws favoring immediate relatives of citizens in matters of citizenship application.

Likewise, undocumented workers who have been here for a longer term are accused of seeking to conceive for that purpose only.

- A.