I'm looking for a lead on that strange, jokey pseudo-language that was invented by some Englishman (I think), many years ago. All I can remember of it was that he could read a passage of normal English prose and convert it into his own kind of jokey language that was just about intelligible. For example, the word "Christmas" might become "Chrimbly-mould". That's about the only illustration I can think of. I just have this vague recollection of an old guy with no teeth talking it on some black-and-white movie. I think he got quite well known for this unusual skill, and appeared in one or two movies or early TV programs perhaps. Anyone know who I'm talking about? Ideally, I'd like to find an online dictionary of that "language", if one exists. Otherwise, any online examples of it...
Thank you...
K
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Unfortunately, I cannot help you there, but I can provide some insight on pseudo-languages. Most of them involve simply changing some single convention of pronounced English. Pig Latin is the most well known, by misplacing sounds and verbs, the resulting language is difficult to understand to the untrained ear. Other pseudo-languages might place a consonant sound before long verb sounds, or the like. Often, these dialects are very easy to learn, and are a huge difference from real English. If you cannot find a pseudo-language, invent one.
Unfortunately, I cannot help you there, but I can provide ... real English. If you cannot find a pseudo-language, invent one.

Yes, I have come accross 'pig-Latin' and similar pseudo-languages. The one I am looking for however, is, I think, different from those in that it didn't conform to any exact method. I think he used to make up most of the words on the fly. However, everything still seemed to conform to the general style. I think he had a few stock syllables that he'd tag onto the ends of suitable words, but that's probably about the only recurring device he used, IIRC.
K
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I'm looking for a lead on that strange, jokey pseudo-language that was invented by some Englishman (I think), many years ... Ideally, I'd like to find an online dictionary of that "language", if one exists. Otherwise, any online examples of it...

Many performers have included that type of thing in their act. Professor Irwin Corey comes to mind as does Durwood Fincher, a.k.a. Dr. Robert Payne. Sid Caesar, Danny Kaye and Pat Paulson included it their routines. My favorite was Lord Buckley reciting biblical stories.
I'm looking for a lead on that strange, jokey pseudo-language that was invented by some Englishman (I think), many years ... into his own kind of jokey language that was just about intelligible. For example, the word "Christmas" might become "Chrimbly-mould".

Sounds like Stanley Unwin. Check archives of
the BBC in its first 10 or 20 years.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Yes, I have come accross 'pig-Latin' and similar pseudo-languages. The one I am looking for however, is, I think, different ... that he'd tag onto the ends of suitable words, but that's probably about the only recurring device he used, IIRC.

It sounds like "double-talk." From the entry for that word in the *Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary* at www.m-w.com :

"*1 :* language that appears to be earnest and meaningful but in fact is a mixture of sense and nonsense
"*2 :* inflated, involved, and often deliberately ambiguous language"

Most people today are probably familiar only with the second definition given, which is quite different from the first definition, which was the name of a specialty practiced by some vaudeville (BrE, "music-hall") entertainers.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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I'm looking for a lead on that strange, jokey pseudo-language ... "language", if one exists. Otherwise, any online examples of it...

Many performers have included that type of thing in their act. Professor Irwin Corey comes to mind as does Durwood Fincher, a.k.a. Dr. Robert Payne. Sid Caesar, Danny Kaye and Pat Paulson included it their routines. My favorite was Lord Buckley reciting biblical stories.

When Sid Caesar was speaking mock English, I'd refer to that as "double-talk," but I see that in an interview with Larry King, a transcript of which can be seen at
cccookie76.tripod.com/wltxt/dc-9-7-01.txt
Carl Reiner (appearing on the same program as Sid Caesar) referred to the mock foreign languages he and Caesar spoke as "double-talk" and the artist as a "double-talker." (Actually, the transcript shows no hyphens, but we should hold the transcriptionist responsible for that.)

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
(Email Removed) typed thusly:
I'm looking for a lead on that strange, jokey pseudo-language ... about intelligible. For example, the word "Christmas" might become "Chrimbly-mould".

Sounds like Stanley Unwin. Check archives of the BBC in its first 10 or 20 years.

Definitely Stanley Unwin, who died only a couple of years ago, aged
90.http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/tv and radio/1759640.stm

I was surprised to see that he was born in South Africa.

David
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I'm looking for a lead on that strange, jokey pseudo-language that was invented by some Englishman (I think), many years ... Ideally, I'd like to find an online dictionary of that "language", if one exists. Otherwise, any online examples of it...

As Don Phillipson suggests, you are describing "Professor" Stanley Unwin.
Matti
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