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I'm interesting to know if anyone can tell me why this sentence is wrong?

"During the 1700s, Philadelphia developed into the most wealthy city in the American colonies"

Thank you in advance for replay.
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It seems okay to me. What do you think is wrong with it?

(It is missing a period, but I don't think that was what you were asking.)
I would say this:

"During the 1700s, Philadelphia developed into the most wealthy city OF the American colonies"
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Hi,
To me, it seems fine as written.

Clive
Hi Yadoo
yadoo86I'm interesting interested to know if anyone can tell me why this sentence is wrong?

"During the 1700s, Philadelphia developed into the most wealthy city in the American colonies"

Thank you in advance for your replay.

I don't see anything wrong (except for the missing period) either.
The only thing I might mention is that "wealthiest" is more commonly used than "most wealthy".
hahahah,
i liked the answers..
lol
"most wealthy" do not fit together, you should say "wealthiest"
thats it !
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I find it interesting when people learn rules and then say "that's the only way it can be." You have three native-speaking moderators saying it's okay to say "most wealthy" (although one did say "wealthier" is more common) and yet you insist that it's wrong. Most "rules" in English are only guidelines or what is usually true. I think you can trust three native-speaking moderators to not misguide the people who post questions here.
Well, this semi-native also agrees that "most wealthy" is just as correct as "wealthiest", all though less commonly heard.
It should read:  "During the 1700s, Philadelphia developed into the wealthiest city in the American colonies."

Two-syllable adjectives, ending in -y, are made into superlatives by using '-iest' - all other two-syllable adjectives use 'most'.
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