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In each of the following sentences, "whatever" refers to which parts of speech? Please explain why.
1. Whatever you do is right.
2. Whatever you do, don't burn the toast.

Thank You
GB
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Comments  
They are both pronouns. Whatever can also be an adjective, but there is no noun modified by it in your sentences, so it can only be a pronoun. What else can I tell you?
Is whatever a subject in both of the sentences.
GB
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Is whatever a subject in both of these sntences.
GB
1. Whatever you do is right.-- Whatever is the pronoun object of do; Whatever you do is a nominal clause and the subject of the main clause.

2. Whatever you do, don't burn the toast. -- Whatever is the pronoun object of do; Whatever you do is a nominal clause, and a sentence adverbial.
Well this is exactly what I can't figure out. How would I know when "whatever" is used as an adverbial and when is it used as a noun?
GB
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Whatever is always a pronoun or adjective. When it heads a dependent clause, it is the entire clause that has various functions. Whatever works just like what:

I like whatever/what I see. (dependent clause is verb object)
What/whatever turns you on is healthy. (dependent clause is sentence subject)
What/Whatever do you want? (pronoun is verb object)
What/whatever caused that lump on your forehead? (pronoun is subject of sentence)

As part of an adverbial clause, it seems that what does not work-- at least I cannot think of an example:

Whatever you do, don't touch that button!
Whatever the reason, he refuses to go.

And as an adverb itself, whatever has a very limited and casual use: We're having pizza tonight.-Whatever. I don't care.

Thanks you Mister Micawber, good explanation.
GB.

It cannot be a pronoun...A pronoun is a word used to replace a noun. Whatever in this case is not replacing any noun.
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