This is an excerpt from a newspaper article.
"Have you ever done a Dutchie?" the girl from Holland asks, holding my gaze.

Well, as a matter of fact, there was a time, back in the '70s, on a skiing trip in Switzerland, when it might have happened, but ...

"No," I reply, hoping to sound resolute. I have never done a Dutchie, and I'm not going to do a Dutchie now: at least, not this Dutchie.
This is an excerpt from a newspaper article. "Have you ever done a Dutchie?" the girl from Holland asks, holding ... I have never done a Dutchie, and I'm not going to do a Dutchie now: at least, not this Dutchie.

It's not very clear, but she's asking whether he's ever done it (presumably: had sex) with someone from Holland. At least that's what he thinks she's asking. If this is a joke, she may go on to explain that "a Dutchie" is something completely different. It does seem to be used as a slang term for a Dutch person (person from Holland), though.
I remember a pop song from way back in the 80s to the title "Pss the dutchie from the left (or right) hand side", the Dutchie referring to a joint.

Fred
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I remember a pop song from way back in the 80s to the title "Pss the dutchie from the left (or right) hand side", the Dutchie referring to a joint.

According to this site:
http://www.songfacts.com/detail.lasso?id=397
"dutchie" is actually a pot.
I remember a pop song from way back in the ... (or right) hand side", the Dutchie referring to a joint.

According to this site: http://www.songfacts.com/detail.lasso?id=397 "dutchie" is actually a pot.

In Canada, a dutchie is a squarish sugar-coated donut with no hole. It has raisins.
http://www.timhortons.com/images/ourmenu lunch Donutbulletlist.jpg (second donut from the right)

It may have been invented (as they claim) by Tim Hortons, but it is a widely-understood term.
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In Canada, a dutchie is a squarish sugar-coated donut with no hole. It has raisins. http://www.timhortons.com/images/ourmenu lunch Donutbulletlist.jpg (second donut from the right) It may have been invented (as they claim) by Tim Hortons, but it is a widely-understood term.

I think I recall getting them at outlets of the lamented National System of Baking, long before Tim started dealing in edible pucks. Just to state the obvious, "dutchie" could be an ozzification of "dutch oven", the which why shouldn't a Jamaican be as likely to use as the rest of us? CDB
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In Canada, a dutchie is a squarish sugar-coated donut with no hole. It has raisins.

In England a Dutchie is a source of income for well bred layabouts only, obviously, we spell it Duchy.
Hence the first verse of the song:
This generation
Rules the nation
With version

John Dean
Oxford