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Hi,

'He hates to go out on a rainy day.'

'He hates going out on a rainy day.'

Does 'hate' mean 'dislike very much' here?

What is the difference between the two sentences in meaning?

Thanks in advance
Comments  
Hi,

'He hates to go out on a rainy day.'

'He hates going out on a rainy day.'

Does 'hate' mean 'dislike very much' here? Basically, yes.

What is the difference between the two sentences in meaning? None, really.

Best wishes, Clive
Hi Clive,

Thank you very much.

Could you tell me which form is better or both are fine in the sentences below?

1.John hates to do/doing his homwork. He doesn't have much time to have fun because he always has lots of homework to do.

2.He never gambles because he hates to gamble/gambling.

Thanks in advance.
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Hi,

Both versions are OK.

Clive
AnonymousWhat is the difference between the two sentences in meaning?
There are exceedingly few cases where there is any difference. On rare occasions, the gerund form allows an interpretation with a generic subject (anybody) that is different from the subject in the main clause.
He hates to lie, cheat, and steal can only mean he hates these things when he does them.
He hates lying, cheating, and stealing can mean he hates these thing when he does them, or it can mean that he hates these things when anybody does them.
CJ
Jim,

You are the God of explanation !
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Thanks, Goodman! Emotion: embarrassed
CalifJim[He hates to lie, cheat, and steal can only mean he hates these things when he does them.

CJ

Hi Clive and CJ,

Thank you very much.

CJ:

Do you mean when infinitive form is used like the above sentence, the person actually does them?

Thanks a lot.
Hi,

Then how should I say if I want to express this kind of difference.
1. the event that I went out.
2. the event that I will go out.

The difference between #1 and #2 is the tense: the past and future.

Q1) So the sentence "I hate to go out on a rainy day" has a meaning close to # 2 or can't have such a implication? And "I hate going out on a rainy day" has to #1?

Q2) The verb "hate" can't be the same type as the verbs like "remember" and "forget"?
"I forgot to see him the next day" (a possible future event from the past)
"I forgot seeing him in the park." (the past)
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