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This is a symbol for those who have tried escaping.

vs

This is a symbol for those who had tried escaping.

Are they both accurate? Does the had suggest the people escaping in the past? And does the have suggest that the people had just done it?
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Hi,

Consider these simpler examples.

They have cooked dinner. They did it at some point in the past. Maybe a long time ago, maybe not.

They had cooked dinner. They did it at some point in the past before some other point in the past.
eg Tom came home at 8pm. yesterday. Mary had cooked dinner.

This is a symbol for those who have tried escaping. For people who tried at some point in the past. Maybe a long time ago, maybe not.

vs

This is a symbol for those who had tried escaping. For people who tried before some point in the past, that would have been mentioned in an earlier sentence.

Best wishes, Clive
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I get different meanings from the two sentences.
AnonymousThis is a symbol for those who have tried escaping.
"Have tried" is a very indefinite reference to time before (or up to) now. Thus, this tends to suggest that more people might possibly try escaping in the future.
AnonymousThis is a symbol for those who had tried escaping.
To me, the use of the past perfect ("had tried") suggests "tried but did not succeed". The reference is clearly to the finished past.

By the way, I think it would be better to use the infinitive (tried to escape) if you mean "attempted an escape but did not succeed".
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Comments  
AnonymousThis is a symbol for those who have tried escaping.
The attempts to escape continued until the time this sentence was uttered or written.
AnonymousThis is a symbol for those who had tried escaping.
The attempts to escape continued until some time in the past. (That time is -- hopefully! -- made clear by the context in which this sentence occurs.)

CJ
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