+0
Recently I read in one of the posts that "What's it?" is incorrect, but yesterday I was told by a native speaker of BrE that it is perfectly acceptable in spoken English. Is he correct?
1 2
Comments  (Page 2) 
I was told by a native speaker of BrE that it is perfectly acceptable in spoken English. Is he correct?
Yes, but the circumstances in which it is used idiomatically are exceedingly rare.
The stress must be on the word it, and to be clear, it should be in quotes.

-- While I was having breakfast, I accidentally dropped it on the floor.
-- What's "it"?
-- The coffee pot.


CJ
CalifJim
I was told by a native speaker of BrE that it is perfectly acceptable in spoken English. Is he correct?
Yes, but the circumstances in which it is used idiomatically are exceedingly rare.
The stress must be on the word it, and to be clear, it should be in quotes.

-- While I was having breakfast, I accidentally dropped it on the floor.
-- What's "it"?
-- The coffee pot.


CJ

As a British-English native speaker I have got no idea what the above completely fabricated pseudo-exchange dialogue is all about?

'Wotsit' has got nothing to do with the above fabrication at all and is indeed extremely common is natural UK-informal speech. See my earlier post.

And while you're at it, take a look at http://cgi.peak.org/~jeremy/retort.cgi and type in 'wotsit' for a translation from UK-speak to US-speak...
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
The original poster wanted to know about the sentence "What's it?", the contraction of "What is it?", not about the noun "what's-it" or "wotsit".

CJ
You're perfectly right, CJ

PS I also find your "fabricated" dialogue perfectly easy to understand!
Thanks for the vote of confidence, J Lewis!

CJ
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?