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Hi teachers,

A manager (John) and his assistant along with a few clients are in a meeting, at which an agreement is unlikely to reach between the clients and this manager, and to a point the meeting is getting mired. The assistant senses that it'd best he talk to the clients privately for a few moments before the meeting continues on.

Would the following sayings be appropriate?

1. John, would you leave us? (This would seems inappropriate because John holds higher rank over the assistant despite the fact John and his assistant are very good friends)

2. John, would you give us some moments?

3. John, can I talk to them privately?

Another question is when you say "in front of my staff" does it implie that the staff are subordinate to you? Same goes as "one of our staff"?

Thanks

TN
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Hi,

In my experience, most assistants would not do anything to exclude their manager in such a way. Doing such a thing would not enhance their career prospects.

Clive
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First, I will correct the body and then answer the question..

Hi teachers,

A manager, John, his assistant and a few clients are in a meeting, in which an agreement is unlikely to be reached between the clients and John. The meeting is getting mired. The assistant senses that it'd be best if he talked to the clients privately for a few moments before the meeting continues.

Would the following sayings be appropriate?

1. John, would you leave us? (This would seems inappropriate because John holds higher rank over the assistant despite the fact John and his assistant are very good friends) No, not only is it inappropriate; it is counterproductive and actually a bit rude. Now, John and the assistant don't seem to be on the same team. John is certain to be angry and/or embarrassed. Even if they are friends, at work, he is the boss.

2. John, would you give us a moment? Slightly better but not much. Still inappropriate.

3. John, can I talk to them privately? Here the assistant asks permission but it is still not appropriate. John is put on the spot and if he complies, his authority is weakened. If he says no, he looks like a jerk. He is put into a lose-lose situation.

What is appropriate? 1. Suffer in silence. 2. Subtly make eye contact with John and try to get him into the hall to discuss strategy away from the others. The move into the hall should be presented by John. Then John and the assistant can work together. They come back in and John makes an excuse to leave.

Another question is when you say "in front of my staff" does it imply that the staff are subordinate to you? Yes Same goes as "one of our staff"? Yes

Thanks

TN
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Hi cwtch,

There are some very active-agressive suggestions there you got.

Thank you.

TN
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
Hi Clive,

That is an important advice. I'll remember that.

Thank you.

TN
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