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What's thy, thou, and thee mean?
I would be greatly appreciated if someone could explain these sentences below for me.

"Yet, it does appear the have already been so generous thou needest not to labor. I rejoice with thee in thy good fortune. More, I would even share it with thee. Pray, from thy purse which must be bulging else thou woudst be busy in yon shop. extract by two humble shekels and lend them to me until after the noblemen's feast this night. Thou wilt not miss them ere they are returned."

Please...

Thank you inadvance.
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More accurately, that's the second person singular pronoun.

'Thou' corresponds to 'I/you/he/she'. (Nominative)
'Thee' corresponds to 'me/you/him/her'. (Accusative)
'Thy' corresponds to 'my/your/his/her'. (Possessive)
'Thine' -- 'mine/yours/his/hers'.

It's an archaic form, and its status was similar to the French vous/tu. At one time, it was the formal form, but became the familiar form around Shakespeare's time.

As for the archaic plural form...

Nominative / Accusative / Possessive
Ye (or you) / you / your, yours
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Hi,

It's an archaic pronoun meaning 'you', with 'thou' as the subject form and 'thee' as the object form.Emotion: smile

Best wishes, Clive
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mountain What's thy, thou, and thee mean?
I would be greatly appreciated if someone could explain these sentences below for me.
"Yet, it does appear the have already been so generous thou needest not to labor. I rejoice with thee in thy good fortune. More, I would even share it with thee. Pray, from thy purse which must be bulging else thou woudst be busy in yon shop. extract by two humble shekels and lend them to me until after the noblemen's feast this night. Thou wilt not miss them ere they are returned."
Please...
Thank you in advance.

What Does Thou, Thy And Thee Mean?

Thee, thou, and thine (or thy) are Early Modern English second person singular pronouns. Thou is the subject form (nominative), thee is the object form, and thy/thine is the possessive form.


thou - singular informal, subject (Thou art here. = You are here.)

thee - singular informal, object (He gave it to thee.)

ye - plural or formal, subject

you - plural or formal, object

Equivalents of Thou, Thee, Thy, Thine

Thou -> You [subject]

Thou hast brought sunshine to many lives.

You have brought sunshine to many lives.

In this sentence, "you" is a subject, so we use "thou."


Thee -> You [object]

I rejoice with thee in thy good fortune.

I rejoice with you in your good fortune.

In this sentence, "you" is an object so we use "thee" instead of "thou."


Thy -> Your [Possessive form]

I rejoice with thee in thy good fortune.

I rejoice with you in your good fortune.

In this sentence, we see a possessive form of the pronoun "you" - "your." That's why we use "thy."


Thine -> Your [Possessive form used before noun]

“If thine enemy wrongs thee, buy each of his children a drum.”

"If your enemy wrongs you, buy each of his children a drum."

In this sentence, we see a possessive form “thy” or “thine”

Sentences translated in modern day language

"Yet, it does appear thee have already been so generous thou needest not to labor. I rejoice with thee in thy good fortune. More, I would even share it with thee. Pray, from thy purse which must be bulging else thou wouldst be busy in yon shop. extract by two humble shekels and lend them to me until after the nobleman's feast this night. Thou wilt not miss them ere they are returned."


"Yet, it does appear (that) you have already been so generous (that) you need not labor. I rejoice with you in your good fortune. More, I would even share it with you. Pray, from your purse which must be bulging else you would be busy in that shop. Extract by two humble shekels and lend them to me until after the nobleman's feast this night. You will not miss them before they are returned."

Reference:

https://logosliterature.wordpress.com/2019/01/04/thou-thee-thy-thine-ye-meanings-usage /

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Comments  
Thou and thee mean "you". Though I think "thou" might be used for both singular and plural while "thee" is only singular. Thy means "your" (belonging to you).
Are they english words?
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Yes they are English words but it is old English, i.e. not used anymore except in books and films that are set in old times.
 ihavenoname's reply was promoted to an answer.
"Yet, it does appear 'you' have already been so generous 'you' needest not to labor. I rejoice with 'you' in 'my' good fortune. More, I would even share it with 'you'. Pray, from 'my' purse which must be bulging else 'I' woudst be busy in 'your' shop. extract by two humble shekels and lend them to me until after the noblemen's feast this night. "You' wilt not miss them ere they are returned."
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why, i asked is because i have to put the texas pleage in pictures for school
thee means you so does thou and thy means yours
"Thee" means "you" (complement), "thou" is "you" (subject), and "thy" is "your".
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