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I MIGHT do it later when we are more developed as a team.


is "more developed" one point in time, or a long state in time? Does it mean as soon as they get more developed, he might do it? Or sometime after? I'm confused.

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Julian Ng-Thow-HingIs "more developed" one point in time

Yes, but it will be the speaker's judgment when that point of time is reached.

Julian Ng-Thow-HingDoes it mean as soon as they get more developed, he might do it?

Yes, he might do it then. (Maybe.)

Julian Ng-Thow-HingOr sometime after?

Yes, he might do it then. (Maybe.)


Do you understand 'might'? It means something like 'maybe'.

If he might do something later, maybe he will do it as soon as possible and maybe he will wait longer than that. Both are possibilities that occur later.

CJ

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So there will be a point in time where the owner decides that his clan is "more developed", and then at that time, he might do it, or might not? What does "more developed" mean? Is it judged based off the owner? Or is it objective?


Will the decision decide whether or not the possibility becomes true or not? Or even if the person decides not to do it, "might do it when we are more developed" is still true?

Julian Ng-Thow-HingIs it judged based off the owner?

It's based on the opinion of the person who is going to make the judgment.

Julian Ng-Thow-HingOr is it objective?

No. Almost nothing in life or especially in language is objective. You have to do math and science if you want objective.

Julian Ng-Thow-Hingif the person decides not to do it, "might do it when we are more developed" is still true?

Yes. That's what 'might' (or 'maybe') means.

I might buy some eggs.
= I will buy some eggs or I will not buy some eggs; I don't know.

CJ

I know, but when the owner decides that tehy are "more develoepd" now, and faces the decision, and decides not to do it, his initial statement: "I might do it when we're more developed as a team." turns false? Or is it still possibile that it will become true (if the owner ever decides to change his mind)?

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Julian Ng-Thow-Hing

I know, but when the owner decides that tehy are "more develoepd" now, and faces the decision, and decides not to do it, his initial statement: "I might do it when we're more developed as a team." turns false? Or is it still possibile that it will become true (if the owner ever decides to change his mind)?

You're not thinking this through the right way. If you say "I might do it", you say "It is possible that I will do it, and it is possible that I will not do it".

This kind of statement is always true because it's always possible either to do something or not to do it.

We don't say it's true if you do it and it's false if you don't do it. The original statement is not about doing it or not doing it. It's about the possibility.

CJ

No but if the person decides not to do it when they’re more developed, then the possibility becomes false because it is his decision, and he is deciding not to do it, rendering it impossible?

Julian Ng-Thow-Hing

No but if the person decides not to do it when they’re more developed, then the possibility becomes false because it is his decision, and he is deciding not to do it, rendering it impossible?

"Possibility" can't be true or false. It's only someone's claim that something is possible that can be true or false.

The original statement of the speaker is this:

I might do it when we're more developed as a team.
Recall that this implies that he might also not do it when they're more developed as a team.

We have to assume that he was speaking sincerely when he said this, so his claim is true. It doesn't matter what happens later. We can't go backwards in time and say that it is no longer true. The statement itself is irrelevant once time has passed.

Besides, his decision not to do it later does not necessarily make it impossible for him to do it even later.

CJ

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