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Hello,

1. when they / gave their books

to the teacher/ allowed to play outside.

I have to write a sentences using the given words. The starting word is,

a) When they had given their books to the teacher, the teacher allowed them to play.

b) When the teacher allowed to them to play, they had given their books to the teacher.

I know the sequence of the events. The problem is that what would be the starting tense of the clause after the word "when".

Shall I use "simeple past" fist as shown in (2) or start with the past perfect as shown in (2)?

What would be the correct sequence ? Keep in mind that the starting word is given as "WHEN".
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I don't quite know what you are up to, Hanuman, but A makes sense while B does not. Some other options:

When they had given their books to the teacher, they were allowed to play outside.
They were allowed to play outside when they had given their books to the teacher.


If you know the sequence of events-- it is the earlier event which receives the past perfect verb form.
Hanuman_2000Hello,

1. when they / gave their books

to the teacher/ allowed to play outside.

I have to write a sentences using the given words. The starting word is,

a) When they had given their books to the teacher, the teacher allowed them to play.

b) When the teacher allowed to them to play, they had given their books to the teacher.

I know the sequence of the events. The problem is that what would be the starting tense of the clause after the word "when".

Shall I use "simeple past" fist as shown in (2) or start with the past perfect as shown in (2)?

What would be the correct sequence ? Keep in mind that the starting word is given as "WHEN".

Given the above context and condition, "A" is the only acceptable and understood construct.

When we use words like “when”, while, before, “after” etc. in compound past perfect tense, it’s usually the past perfect tense that comes before the clause.

Ex: I had taught English part time when I was in collage.

She had been married to Peter for a year before she found out his drinking habit.




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GoodmanWhen we use words like “when”, while, before, “after” etc. in compound past perfect tense, it’s usually the past perfect tense that comes before the clause.

Ex: I had taught English part time when I was in collage. Hello Goodman

Could you kindly rephrase this for me? I'm not sure what this sentence means.
Do you mean by this you were an English teacher before entering a college?

paco
I guess this discussion invites lot of questions.
Mister MicawberI don't quite know what you are up to, Hanuman, but A makes sense while B does not. Some other options:

When they had given their books to the teacher, they were allowed to play outside.
They were allowed to play outside when they had given their books to the teacher.

If you know the sequence of events-- it is the earlier event which receives the past perfect verb form.

Sometime back I red somewhere (esl.about.com?) ;in a time adverbial clause , "when" takes either simple present and simple past. Is it correct?
Goodman

Ex: I had taught English part time when I was in collage.


I see a disconnect between "when" and "had taught" ;may be it is just me. Here, "when" means "at that time" which contradicts with "had taught".
Yes, I think that Goodman may want to revise his sentence, Rishonly.

Regarding tenses after when: any is possible, I would think. The thread you mention was possibly discussing other matters.

When I saw him, he was smoking heavily.
When I see him, I will tell him to stop smoking.
When I had smoked the cigarette down to its filter, I ate the butt.
When I have finished talking, I will go home
.
When I could stand up again, I staggered off to the grandstand.
etc.
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Mister MicawberYes, I think that Goodman may want to revise his sentence, Rishonly.

Regarding tenses after when: any is possible, I would think. The thread you mention was possibly discussing other matters.

When I saw him, he was smoking heavily.
When I see him, I will tell him to stop smoking.
When I had smoked the cigarette down to its filter, I ate the butt.
When I have finished talking, I will go home
.
When I could stand up again, I staggered off to the grandstand.
etc.

Thanks for your feedback, MM. This is the [url= ] URL[/url] (First row and third column in the 'Adverb Clauses with Time' table) that I was talking about. Any advice?
I know the About website, Rishonly, but I hadn't noticed that particular page. It seems to me extremely rigid and/or out of touch with current English: that's all I can say. In addition to the variety of tenses I gave you above, I could easily add to About's table:

I have always finished dressing before my mother served breakfast.
She cooked while I made the wine.
We have been well entertained every time we have visited Singapore.
Mister MicawberI know the About website, Rishonly, but I hadn't noticed that particular page. It seems to me extremely rigid and/or out of touch with current English:
That disentangles the whole puzzle, MM;therefore,I am sure I wouldn't visit that site again. Emotion: smile Thanks for your guidance.
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