Do you have a sentence that uses "effect" & "affect" properly?

For example, I remember the difference between "few" vs "less" with: "Less crime; fewer police"
(i.e., use "fewer" when you can actually count; use "less" otherwise).

Another example is the personal pronoun "who" vs "whom" as in: "Who is chasing whom; he is chasing him"
(i.e., use "whom" just like you already know how to use "him").

A third example is "lay" vs "lie", as in:
"The boots now lie where the body lay"
(this one comes from a National Geographic article on the Titanic & Ballard).

Back to the original question:
Q: Do you have a sentence which clearly exemplifies the difference between the useage (usage?) of "affect" vs "effect"?
Orak Listalavostok
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Orak> Do you have a sentence that uses "effect" & "affect" Orak> properly?
Definition 1: "effect" is a noun.
Definition 2: "affect" is a verb.
Theorem: A sentence uses them properly if and only if it is grammatical.
Examples:
The price rise is an effect of the shortage.
The shortage affects the price.
Orak> For example, I remember the difference between "few" vs Orak> "less" with: "Less crime; fewer police" (i.e., use "fewer" Orak> when you can actually count; use "less" otherwise).

You use "few" with a negative sense.
You use "less" with a positive sense.
e.g.
A: Did many people came to the party?
B: No, fewer than expected. (Pessimistic)
B: Yes, (although) less than expcted. (Optimistic)
Orak> Another example is the personal pronoun "who" vs "whom" as Orak> in: "Who is chasing whom; he is chasing him" (i.e., use Orak> "whom" just like you already know how to use "him").

Right. Those aren't distinguished anymore in American usage.
Orak> A third example is "lay" vs "lie", as in: "The boots now lie Orak> where the body lay" (this one comes from a National Orak> Geographic article on the Titanic & Ballard).

"to lay", "to raise" are transitive.
"to lie", "to rise" are intransitive.
Orak> Back to the original question: Q: Do you have a sentence Orak> which clearly exemplifies the difference between the useage Orak> (usage?) of "affect" vs "effect"?
See above.

Lee Sau Dan +Z05biGVm- ~{@nJX6X~}

E-mail: (Email Removed)
Home page: http://www.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/~danlee
Do you have a sentence that uses "effect" & "affect" properly? For example, I remember the difference between "few" vs ... question: Q: Do you have a sentence which clearly exemplifies the difference between the useage (usage?) of "affect" vs "effect"?

The effect of this will affect many.
This affects many things, but will not effect any change.
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Do you have a sentence that uses "effect" & "affect" properly?

"affect" = 'influence'; "effect" = 'bring about', and is quite rare.

Conversely, the noun "effect" is very common, the noun "affect" is extremely rare.

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
Do you have a sentence that uses "effect" & "affect" properly? For example, I remember the difference between "few" vs "less" with: "Less crime; fewer police" (i.e., use "fewer" when you can actually count; use "less" otherwise).

I'm going to have to support Carmen Abruzzi's "The effect of this change will affect many".

Christopher Adams - Sydney, Australia
What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nath Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?
You're not a bad person. You're a terrific person. You're my favorite person. But every once in a while you just can be a real ***. - Bill
Orak> Back to the original question: Q: Do you have a sentence Orak> which clearly exemplifies the difference between the useage Orak> (usage?) of "affect" vs "effect"? See above.

Here's a science-y one:
"Failure to allow for the Hall Effect negatively affected the outcome of the experiment."
Effect is used as a noun, affect is used as a verb. A simpler general statement would be:
"An unexpected effect can affect the result."
D
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Orak> Do you have a sentence that uses "effect" & "affect" Orak> properly? Definition 1: "effect" is a noun. Definition 2: "affect" is a verb.

Ah, not quite true. "Affect" is also a noun in the sense of a behaviour which is deliberately "put on" - "he had a very foppish affect", for example. "Effect" is also a verb in the sense of working to produce change - "I will have to effect an alteration in his behaviour", for example.

Christopher Adams - Sydney, Australia
What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nath Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?
You're not a bad person. You're a terrific person. You're my favorite person. But every once in a while you just can be a real ***. - Bill
Conversely, the noun "effect" is very common, the noun "affect" is extremely rare.

You could say there's a general lack of affect...
M. Ruff
Orak> Do you have a sentence that uses "effect" - "affect" Orak> properly? Definition 1: "effect" is a noun. Definition 2: "affect" is a verb.

Actually, both words can function as either noun or verb.

M. Ruff
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