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Which food and drink comes from your country? Which food and drink come from your country? Which of these 2 sentences is grammatically correct?

Is there a rule to follow in the use of come and comes? Does it have something to do with the use of countable and uncountable nouns?

If I write a sentence containing both countable and uncountable nouns, will the placement of the different noun type in the sentence define whether I use come or comes? e.g:

Which cars and fruit comes from your country?

Which fruit and cars come from your country?

Please help, I don't understand!
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In this kind of situation, it is a matter of whether the subject, X and Y, is/are considered by the speaker to be one thing or two separate items:

Bread and peanut butter makes a nice snack. (both uncountable)
A slice of bread and a dollop of peanut butter makes a nice snack. (both countable)

Bread and rice are both eaten in Japan. (both uncountable)
A loaf of bread and a bag of rice are on my shopping list. (both countable)
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Bread and peanut butter make a nice snack. This is what I would have said.

Bread with peanut butter makes a nice snack. I would have said this as well.

A slice of bread and a dollop of peanut butter definitely makes a nice snack!

Therefore,

Bread and peanut butter come from the shop.

A slice of bread and a dollop of peanut butter comes as part of the menu.

Is the rule then that uncountables take the come or make, while the countables take the comes or makes?

What happens if I use an uncountable and a countable together?

The fruit and vegetables comes from Spain. I would have said, "The fruit and vegetables come from Spain". Help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
You are not paying attention, Anglod.
it is a matter of whether the subject, X and Y, is/are considered by the speaker to be one thing or two separate items
Countability does not enter into the equation.
Hello there. I came to your post as I been looking for answers regarding same grammar problem.

Like, Denis Cruz and family come/comes from USA.

My instinct tells me it should be 'comes' as I consider 'Denis Cruz and family; as one unit.

Am I correct? Please help. Thank you.
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Anonymous I consider 'Denis Cruz and family; as one unit.
You may do so, but it is a matter of whether that is or could be a general feeling. I say it is not.

Denis Cruz and family come from the USA.
Oh, okay. Thank you Mister Macawber. Emotion: smile

Which is correct, here comes the difficult part or here come the difficult part.

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