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Is WHEN necessarily followed by either the simple tense or the continuous or both?

Are the players this creative when they are playing with better players than them/when they play with player better than them. (better player or player better??)
A player like him makes some nice plays even when he is playing/he plays against better player than himself.

Which do you say?

She has a lot of sympathy for him/felt a lot of sympathy for him.
She has a lot of empathy with kids/She felt empathy with kids.

How would you say this?

Compared to the pain the doctors said I'd suffer, the pain was bearable.

Thank you
Comments  
Is WHEN necessarily followed by either the simple tense or the continuous or both?
No.

When I have finished this, we can go shopping.

alc24Is WHEN necessarily followed by either the simple tense or the continuous or both?
No. Either is OK. Neverthless, I think I prefer the simple form in most cases.
alc24Which do you say?

She has a lot of sympathy for him/felt a lot of sympathy for him.
She has a lot of empathy with kids/She felt empathy with kids.
Probably felt ... sympathy. I don't often use empathy.
alc24How would you say this?

Compared to the pain the doctors said I'd suffer, the pain was bearable.
My pain was less intense than the doctors predicted.

CJ
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Hello CJ,

How are you?

I had one question, above you said you prefered the siple tense after WHEN.

Could you tell me what you would use in the following?




  • When she’s feeling down/When she feels down she going to call you.


  • Every time she feels/is feeling down she’s going to call you .
Thank you

alc24

  • When she’s feeling down/When she feels down she going to call you.

  • Every time she feels/is feeling down she’s going to call you .
Here's a few versions that I might use. Note that with "feel down" I'm more or less indifferent to whether it's simple or progressive after when.

Does she call you when she's feeling down?
She calls me when she's feeling down.
Whenever she feels down, she calls me.
Whenever she's feeling down, she calls me.
When she starts feeling down, she'll call you.
When she starts to feel down, she'll call you.

As soon as she starts feeling down, she'll call you.
As soon as she starts to feel down, she'll call you.

Feeling down doesn't seem to me to be an event, so it doesn't go well with "every time" (to my ear).

1. Every time I catch a cold / Every time I drink milk / Every time she travels by train

2. *Every time I know how to swim / *Every time I have three brothers

Every time I feel down is on the border between the two above.

Likewise, even with "when", I tend to make it more like an event by adding "start". Then it matches the event of calling better. However,

[When / Whenever] she's feeling down, she listens to music.
[When / Whenever] she feels down, she listens to music.

CJ
Thank you CJ for the explanation.

I just had one question:

Is this alright?

She is going to call you when she feels down.

and do you use the continuous after this WHEN?

- Right wen my life is getting back on track, I find out I'm sick.

Thank you
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thank you CJ for the explanation.

I just had one question:

Is this alright?

She is going to call you when she feels down.

and do you use the continuous after this WHEN?

- Right wen my life is getting back on track, I find out I'm sick.

Thank you
alc24Is this alright? (all right)

She is going to call you when she feels down.
It's grammatically correct. Still, I think these are more idiomatic: She'll call you if she's feeling down. She'll call you if she feels down.
alc24and do you use the continuous after this WHEN?

- Right when my life is getting back on track, I find out I'm sick.
Yes. It's happening as you speak.

You could use the simple tense but the "flavor" is different. If you use the simple present, it may be taken as a substitute for the present perfect (to show the getting back on track has just happened very recently and is a completed event).

right when (or just when) should be considered a special idiom that is a little different from when alone. It has the flavor of being about to achieve some goal. Right when the plane was landing / Just when I was winning / etc.

CJ