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Hi!
I'm posting here for the first time, so if any thread like this alredy exists I'm sorry Emotion: smile

I'd like to know exactly when to use ing and when to use to in a sentance.

Example:

I wish (see) the manager.
I know it's I wish to see the manager, but I don't know why it's like this.
Are there any grammatic rules or how could I know when use ing and when to verb.

More examples:

He dreads (have) to retire.
The boys like (play) games, but hate (do) lessons.
Would you mind (shut) the window? I hate (sit) in a draught.

Thanks in advance!
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Welcome to English Forums!

Your question has to do with catenative verbs.
Here's a good (and colorful) presentation of such verbs.

http://www.geocities.com/endipatterson/Catenative.html

CJ
Comments  
SythHi!
I'm posting here for the first time, so if any thread like this alredy exists I'm sorry Emotion: smile

I'd like to know exactly when to use ing and when to use to in a sentance.

Example:

I wish (see) the manager.
I know it's I wish to see the manager, but I don't know why it's like this.
Are there any grammatic rules or how could I know when use ing and when to verb.

More examples:

He dreads (have) to retire.
The boys like (play) games, but hate (do) lessons.
Would you mind (shut) the window? I hate (sit) in a draught.

Thanks in advance!
Hi Sith,

Welcome!

This may not be “exactly” the answer you want to hear. But I would offer you this. Rule of thumb: for verbs like “desire”, “want”, “like”, “wish”, “intend”, “plan”, “need” and a few others, “infinitive” is the correct choice in most cases. There are exceptions of course but these exceptions are context dependent.

If I ask you: What do you wish to do with your life the most in your life if you have the power to choose?

You may say “I wish to become a pilot”. Not becoming.

What do you plan to do this weekend?

I am planning to have a picnic at .

Sometimes, the verb, “like” can take on either gerund or infinitive without compromise the meaning.

I like to meet / meeting new friends = both are equally good sentences. I hope this helps ...!Emotion: smile
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
HI!

I WANT KNOW ALOT ABOUT USING SINCE&FOR IN PRESENT PERFECT TENCE&PRESENTCONTINOUS TENSE BECAUSE I SAW MANY PEOPLE USING SINCE AND FOR WITH PRESENT PERFECT AND PRESENT CONTINOUS

FOR EXAMPLE:

THEY ARE TRYING TO THIS DO FOR WEEKS

THEY HAVE BEEN TRYING TO DO THIS FOR WEEKS