When to use "has/have/had been" and "having been"

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hi, sorry, english is not my first language (I'm learning the basics now). Can someone help me with this problem?

I know when to use has/have/had (they are past perfect and present perfect), but when should I use "has been" or "have been" or "had been"? I've seen these before in english book, but I cannot find any rule or reason as to what this is. Can someone explain to me when or when not to use it? Why can't I just use "has" instead of "has been"?

also, the same with "having been". What is this and when is it used?

also, what is "been"? It's a form of "be", but what is "be"? Can someone help me understand why this is used in a sentence?

thanks so much, and sorry for asking a lot Emotion: smile
New Member10
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'Been' is the past participle of 'be', just like 'gone' is the past participle of 'go', and it is used in precisely the same way:

I go to school every day.
I am happy every day.
I am a Canadian.

I have gone to Disneyland twice this year.
I have been happy twice this year.
I have been a Canadian for 30 years.
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In the purest sense, to be is to exist.

There is a second moon hidden behind the other one.

No, there is not.

Yes, there is.

"Been" has two other uses in forming various tenses:
The passive voice - I am cheated / I have been cheated. (present perfect)
(active voice - Somebody cheated me.)

The perfect progressive tenses - I have been working all day. (present) I had been working until the rain started. (past) The verb here is "to work."

The verb "to be" in its own right uses "been" (past participle) in forming the perfect tenses:

The verb "to be" plus an adjective complement:

I am sick. I have been sick. (present)

I was sick. I had been sick. (past)
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shayredsun:

"be" is the most important verb in English. "been" is the past participle of "be". The present tense of "be" is
I am, you are, he is, we are, they are.

The present perfect of "be" is
I have been
You have been
He has been... etc.
Example:

Question: How have you been?
Answer: I have been sick.

Also, "be" is used in progressive tenses.
I am working. (present of "be" + present participle)

I was working. (past of "be" + present participle)
I will be working (future of "be" + present participle)
I have been working (present perfect of "be" + present participle)
I had been working (past perfect of "be" + present participle)

Also, consider the passive:
I am loved. (present of "be" + past participle)
I was loved. (past of "be" + + past participle)
I will be loved. (future of "be" ++ past participle)
I have been loved (present perfect of "be" + past participle)

Regards,
A-Emotion: stars
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*Use of Have and Had:
1. You use "has had" in a scentence such as: Bob has had so much homework this week, or She has had strep throat 3 times this month. "Have had" is referring to you or someone youre talking to directly, such as: i have had a terrible headache all day, or, You have had too many run-ins with the law.
2.They are past tense, and that's all. Depends on the plural and singular
has had is =singular, have had is =plural.
he has had a bad day.
they have had a bad day.
3.To answer your question, "has had" is used for the third person singular ( he/she/it) while "have had" is used for all other persons (I/you/we/they).
Examples: I have had dinner.
You have had dinner.
He has had dinner.
We have had dinner.
They have had dinner.
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I know when to use has/have/had (they are past perfect and present perfect), but when should I use "has been" or "have been" or "had been"? I've seen these before in english book, but I cannot find any rule or reason as to what this is. Can someone explain to me when or when not to use it? Why can't I just use "has" instead of "has been"?

You might think of it this way, just to start.

'has been' is another form of 'is'.

'have been' is another form of 'are'.

Now. For some time until now.

is > has been

are > have been

Jack is sick today. Jack has been sick for three days.

The boys are late. The boys have been late every day for the last five days.

The door is open. The door has been open since 8 o'clock this morning.

The books are on the table. The books have been on the table since yesterday.

There are a lot of problems There have been a lot of problems

in city government. in city government since 2006.

Using just 'has' or 'have' instead of 'has been' or 'have been' in the sentences above would make no sense. You can be sick or be late, but you can't have sick or have late.

CJ
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As we are using have for we, you they and I and has for he she it; in short have for plural and has for singular, so can we use has for plural without we, you they ? For example: Camera, Computer, Mobile, scanner and stamp has prepared for office use.
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which type of senrence we will call in whicb HAVE HAD or HAS HAD and why is this necessary and yes one more thing there is two verbs has/ have and had .. has/have is use for presesnt and is use for past, which type of sentence it will called??? and which form of verb will use??
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AnonymousAs we are using have for we, you they and I and has for he she it; in short have for plural and has for singular, so can we use has for plural without we, you they ? For example: Camera, Computer, Mobile, scanner and stamp has prepared for office use.
No
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