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Does Due by Monday mean due at the beginning of the workday? Or at the end of the workday?

What's the difference with that phrase compared to: Up to Monday?

Please advise.
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Hi,

With these kind of phrases, it's not always 100% clear whether the day itself is included, and if so, whether it is the end of the day. Often, the context makes it clear. If your life depends on it, or if it involves , for example, making a big payment like the down payment on a house, I'd ask extra questions for clarification.

Does Due by Monday mean due at the beginning of the workday? Or at the end of the workday? Without further information, I'd think 'on Monday by the end of the day'.

What's the difference with that phrase compared to: Up to Monday? '.. by Monday' refers to the period ending on Monday. So does 'up to Monday', but this stresses more the idea of 'until Monday'. Consider these examples.

Please call me by Monday. If you call before Monday, that's OK.

Please call me on Monday. If you call before Monday, that's not OK.

You can call me up to Monday. Don't call me after Monday.

Best wishes, Clive
To take out ambiguity, at workplace it is common to say something like....please turn in your report to me by COB Tuesday. It means by Close Of Business. Here again COB could mean 5pm or 11:50pm depending on when you pack up and go home. But at least you know it's not due the first thing in the morning Tuesday.

Another example is the federal income tax. It is due by the 15th of April every year. The determining factor here is that your tax return has to be post marked by the 15th. Usually the post offices are open till mid night on the 15th to accomodate the procrastinators like myself!

Otherwise, I agree with Clive...it's not always 100% clear.
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The phrase 'due up to Monday' is not familiar to me.

Maybe, 'You have up to/up till Monday [to turn in the completed project]. (There's still some ambiguity in that, since on Monday might be too late.)
Lawyers always take care with these sorts of phrases (or at least they should) as ambiguity may result. Often "from" a certain date does not include the date specified, likewise "to", but it is obviously silly to argue that "from Tuesday to Thursday" means Wednesday only, as if you meant that you would surely simply say "Wednesday". So it is a question of being careful when you need to be.
I'm more used to "due on (Monday)".

As a general rule, if you say to me "your report is due on Monday", I assume you mean "I want your report on my desk some time before the end of Monday".

Whereas if I say to you "your report is due on Monday", it means "I want your report on my desk first thing Monday morning! if not sooner!"

MrP
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Due Monday 12:01 am or when class begins. My daughter and I were just "discussing" this. Think of it this way, your car registration is due BY your birthday... so lets say your birthday is Monday. So Tuesday your registration would be late. Get it? MY 17 YEAR OLD DAUGHTER DOESN'T !!!!! UGH UGH UGH!!!
Anonymous My daughter and I were just "discussing" this.
Tsk, tsk, tsk.
Anonymousyour car registration is due BY your birthday... so lets say your birthday is Monday. So Tuesday your registration would be late. Get it?
Yes. That's correct. "due by Monday" and "Tuesday is too late" go together exactly.
AnonymousMY 17 YEAR OLD DAUGHTER DOESN'T
Doesn't understand that? Or doesn't find it convenient to admit that that is the correct meaning?

Full understanding may come to her when she sees the late fee. Emotion: smile

CJ

I agree with Clive, that this means at the end of the workday. Don't stress yourself out doing it, spread the time out and work in your own pace.

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