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I wonder if someone could explain to me when to use 'as' or 'has', the difference between the two. Thank you.
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AnonymousI wonder if someone could explain to me when to use 'as' or 'has', the difference between the two. Thank you.
These words are very different in meaning. Don't worry about trying to understand all the differences right away! I'll give few examples.

"Has" often shows ownership, belonging, or association. When combined with other verbs, "has" also is used in the present perfect tense (for he, she, and it).

He has two children. He is the father of two children.

She has a new car. She owns a new car.

He has brown hair. His hair is brown. (Brown hair is one of his characteristics.)

She has to go to work soon. She needs to go to work soon. She must go to work soon. (When it is followed by "to", the meaning of "has" often changes. Instead of referring to association or ownership, it refers to need.)

Has he finished school yet? Is he finished with school?

This June has been very hot.

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Often, "as" is used to compare things. But sometimes it can mean "in the capacity of". There probably are other meanings also.

Is he as tall as you are? Is he the same height that you are? Is he tall to the same degree or extent that you are tall? ("As" is used as a word of comparison here.)

Do you like living here as much as you thought you would? (again, a word of comparison...this time the comparison is between how much someone actually likes living somewhere and how much the person believed he or she would like living there)

I'm as hungry as a horse! (comparison, with someone saying that he or she has an appetite like a horse) This means that he or she is very hungry.

They're as angry as they can be. (comparison, with people being angry to the extent that it is possible for them to be angry) ("As" is used twice here.) They are extremely angry.

He doesn't know as much as he thinks he does. (comparison between what someone thinks he knows and what he really knows) ("As" is used twice here.) He doesn't know what he thinks he knows. He is more ignorant than he thinks he is.

She worked as a babysitter when she was very young. (in the capacity of) She was a babysitter when she was very young.

He acted as a peacemaker. (in the capacity of) He performed the duties of a peacemaker.

She acts as if she's my mother. She acts like she's my mother.

She acts as though she's my mother. She acts like she's my mother.
"as" can also be used sometimes as while:
as he was kissing her, she was thinking of her lover...
while he was kissing her, she was thinking of her lover...

it can sometimes be used as when:
as you see the stop light, turn right
when you see the spot light, turn right.
although I think it is wrong to say:
as I met you, I knew I loved you!
it is more common to hear: when I met you, I knew I loved you!
A lot of germans mess up here, because in German their als (kinda similar to as) is used for the past. als ich ein Kind war...->when I was a kid.
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thank you very much.Emotion: smile
Nice explanation..Thanks
Thanks for this explanation, I will bookmark this page..
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Perfect but needs some more explanation
Yes, I feel some more explanation is needed to above mentioned question. And above mentioned answer is only satisfactory, but not good.
what do you mean by "in the capacity of"?
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