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Fair enough, Bill. I enjoy off-the-wall humour as much as the next guy. Do some more Australian jokes, will `ya?

Howard.

I probably missed a joke, or should I assume 'Bill' was a mistake you were pointing out? I could have sworn he admitted the other day his first name is Bill. Oh well. Guess I'll just have to call him Franke until he reveals his full name, unless someone can verify it is Howard Franke. I don't like calling people by their second name only. I make an exception with Coop, since Richard seems to be assuring us it is OK.

Charles Riggs
Charles Riggs wrote on 29 Jul 2004:
Howard.

I probably missed a joke, or should I assume 'Bill' was a mistake you were pointing out? I could have sworn he admitted the other day his first name is Bill.

I never admitted anything about my given names. I actually prefer to be called "Franke". That's what my mother has called my father for the past 65 years or so, what my father has called me for the past almost 61 years, and what my stepmother has called me for the past 36 years. It's also what I ask the students in my EFL classes to call me.
Oh well. Guess I'll just have to call him Franke until he reveals his> full name, unless someone can verify it is Howard Franke.

"Prime Minister John Howard of Australia" was Mike's joke.
I don't like calling people by their second name only. I make an exception with Coop, since Richard seems to be assuring us it is OK.

It's more than okay with me.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
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Do you really consider Areff "young"?

Oh dear. Sorry, Richard, but that made me laugh out loud.

What's so funny?
Oh dear. Sorry, Richard, but that made me laugh out loud.

What's so funny?

'Cos I was referring to YJ, not you, and the comment hit me by surprise.

Rob Bannister
Mike Lyle premed:
Fair enough, Bill. I enjoy off-the-wall humour as much as the next guy. Do some more Australian jokes, will `ya?

Howard.

That's not comedy, it's tragedy. Comedy is Alexander Downer, the man born with a silver foot in his mouth.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
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Mike Lyle premed:

Howard.

That's not comedy, it's tragedy. Comedy is Alexander Downer, the man born with a silver foot in his mouth.

Tragedy is that you guys keep voting the clowns back in.

Zen
Dr Zen premed:
Mike Lyle premed: That's not comedy, it's tragedy. Comedy is Alexander Downer, the man born with a silver foot in his mouth.

Tragedy is that you guys keep voting the clowns back in.

I agree; but it weren't me, it were some other bloke what cancelled out my vote.
We have a federal election coming up about a month from now. As usual, the two main contenders are neck-and-neck, meaning it's really hard to predict the outcome. The way it works, of course, is that there are certain people who will always vote left-wing, and certain others who will always vote right-wing, and because these two groups cancel each other out the final outcome is left to a smaller group of "swinging voters".
This is supposed to be a Good Thing, but is it really? In principle, a swinging voter is someone who carefully examines the issues and votes on the issues and on a refined judgment of who will do the best job this time around. In practice such a discriminating voter is rare. The great majority of swinging voters are people who are so ill-informed that they'll vote randomly, or so easily swayed that their vote will depend on some minor last-minute factor.
Our present government was going to lose the last election, but almost at the last minute some interfering Danish sea captain rescued a boatload of refugees and delivered them to Australia, and that was enough to let the Liberal Party capture the racist vote - almost killing off our main racist party in the process - and win the election against all expectations.
It's getting to the stage now where the outcome of an election depends mainly on the last TV news item that most voters can remember as they go to the polling place. One petty little issue can cancel out people's memories of several years of mismanagement.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)