+7

Is there any rule specifying the usage of has, have and had?

+3

You didn't give any specifics, but here is a set of very basic rules for using "has", "have" and "had".

Present tense

I, you, we, they   =  have
he, she, it, PROPER NAME OR TITLE = has

Past tense (simple)

I, you, we, they, he, she, it, PROPER NAME OR TITLE   =   had

There are also times when it is more correct to use "have had" or "has had", but those rules are a bit more complex

Future tense (simple)

I, you, we, they, he, she, it, PROPER NAME OR TITLE   =   will have
+3

Once you think you've got it, you can try this little quiz.

  1. She eaten her dinner.
  2. When will we another party?
  3. They  a really good time, thanks!
  4. I have no luck.
  5. She finished her dinner.
  6. I two eggs.
  7. She many years of experience.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
+2

Have had follows I, you, we, and they.

I have had...
You have had...
We have had...
They have had...

Has had follows he, she and it.

He has had...
She has had...
It has had...
+1
She has a problem with her family. (Now)
She had a problem with her family. (In the past)
She have a problem with her family. (Not correct)
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Comments  
Yes, there are some rules.

You're asking a very vast question. If you specify it, we will have more chances to help you properly.
Try out our live chat room.
 Anonymous's reply was promoted to an answer.
What does this mean? or is this correct?

no. 1 and 2 are the same?

1. She have a problem with her family.

2. She has a problem with her family.

3. She had a problem with her family.

What does this mean? or is this correct? What do these (sentences) mean? Are these (sentences) correct?

no. 1 and 2 are the same? Are sentences 1 and 2 the same?

1. She have a problem with her family. Incorrect. The pronoun 'she' is third person singular. Use 'has' for third person singulars.

2. She has a problem with her family. Correct. It might mean that she is not getting along quite well with her family.

3. She had a problem with her family. Correct. I believe this is the American way of say 'she has had a problem with her family'. It might mean that she used to have a problem with her family but does not now.



Best wishes,

PBF

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
2. She has a problem with her family.
Would you say something like: The company I work have decided to close for today. (is that correct)
The company will close the work for the day
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
no they are not same.

the correct answer is she had a problem with her.
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