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I'm confused. When is used an expression "I have never heard of you" and when "I have never heard for you"?

My first thought was that one of these expressions is incorrect, but I've found both correct, and now I don't know when to use each expression. Is there any difference between them that they can change the entire meaning of sentence, or maybe it's difference between Am and Brit English?
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American person here:

I have never heard of you - I do not know your name, you are completely unfamiliar to me.

I have never heard from you - You have never corresponded with me, written to me

*I have never heard for you - This has no meaning that I know of
Hi,

I'm confused. When is used an expression

"I have never heard of you" This means that I have never heard your name or any information about you. In other words, it means that I definitely don't know you or anyhting about you.

and when "I have never heard for you"? I've never heard this experession, and it doesn't seem to have any meaning.

Are you sure you don't mean 'I have never heard from you'?

My first thought was that one of these expressions is incorrect, but I've found both correct,<<< Where did you find that the second one is correct? and now I don't know when to use each expression. Is there any difference between them that they can change the entire meaning of sentence, or maybe it's difference between Am and Brit English?
I don't think it's a matter of Am and Brit English.

Best wishes, Clive
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So..'for' is never used. Thanks for clearing this up.
I searched in google for both expressions and there were a few results for 'for'. Maybe some non-english speaker wrote that, as I would if I didn't ask you, I don't know. 'Of' sounds familiar to me, but I thought that 'for' could be used too, because direct translation from my language will be 'for' (actually we don't have a word of as you have). I know that direct translation can't be used in most cases, but this didn't sound odd to me.
Thanks again
I had a quick google and all the examples of 'never heard for you' were people using it in error instead of 'never heard from you'.
Hi,

You never know what combination of words you may find via Google.

Someone might, for instance, write something like this. The red shows how to interpret it.

I have written this list ( of songs that I have never heard ) for you.

Best wishes, Clive
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Hi

The expression "I have never heard FOR you" is used correctly when the person is saying "I have never heard ANYTHING IN SUPPORT OF you.

The expression "List of songs" has nothing to do with music. It means a list of demands or questions.

Regards

Peter
Hi, Peter,
I wonder if this could be a regional expression. You're the first person who has been confident that it's correct. (never heard for you)

I agree it seems logical.
Well, intuitively, "I never heard for you" sounds like, "you never had the ability to hear/opt not to hear for the sake of him/her". If that make sense at all.
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