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Please can somebody explain when to use 'year's' and when to use 'years'? I am getting confused.

e.g. If I was to write I have a year's experience is that correct as you are only referring to one year?

Thanks in advance!

Andy
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One More than one
Possessive year's years'

Not possessive year years
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You can use any of these:
a year's experience; one year's experience; two years' experience; three years' experience
a year of experience; one year of experience; two years of experience; three years of experience
CJ
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Comments  
You may say the following:
I have a year's experience studying in China
I have one year of experience in import and export business with China
I have 10 years' experience working as a planner in China
I have 10 years of experience in dealing with Chinese commerce
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Thanks very much Goodman.

So you use 'year's' when you are purely referring to one year and you use 'years' when you are referring to more than one year?

Andy
Anyone?
I thought I already answered you. I think Goodman's reply is very clear that that's the case.
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Thanks new2grammar.

So, just to triple check, you are saying that the below rule is correct:

'So you use 'year's' when you are purely referring to one year and you use 'years' when you are referring to more than one year'. Also, you would never write 'one year's experience', instead, you would write 'a year's experience' or 'one year of experience'

Sorry to ask for so much clarfication, but I just want to make sure my understanding is correct :-).

Andy
Andyw12345you use 'year's' when you are purely referring to one year and you use 'years' when you are referring to more than one year'.
I won't repeat my answer. Because you might ask again. To convince yourself, ask yourself this.
I have a cat or I have a cats
The cat's toys are fluffy. (There is one cat but many toys)
The cats' toys are fluffy. (How many cats are there?)
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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That's why there is only one C.J. One word says it all, "possessive"
Your explanation is simple and clear.
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