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Can I say,

When / while Jack and John were walking, Jack stepped a rusty nail.

When / While Jack was walking by the river, he stepped at/ in / into a rusty nail.

When / While Jack was walking to the stream, he stepped on the nail.
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Comments  
Can I say,

John stepped on a rusty nail and felt pain / painful in his leg.

John was pain painful of his leg.

John had a pain in his leg.
Can I say,

John stepped on the nail. Ali quickly carried him and ran towards to a clinic nearby.
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Vincent TeoCan I say,

John stepped on the nail. Ali quickly carried him and ran towards to a clinic nearby.

'the' nail if it has been previously mentioned, otherwise a nail.

John stepped on the/a nail. Ali quickly carried him and ran towards to a clinic nearby.
John stepped on a rusty nail and felt pain / painful in his leg.

John was pain painful of his leg. - NO

John had a pain in his leg. - OK.
When / while Jack and John were walking, Jack stepped on a rusty nail.

When / While Jack was walking by the river, he stepped on at/ in / into a rusty nail.

When / While Jack was walking to the stream, he stepped on the/a nail.
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Can I say,

When / while Jack and John were walking, Jack stepped on a rusty nail on / at the road.
When / while Jack and John were walking, Jack stepped on a rusty nail in on / at the road.
why do we use "in the road" instead of "on the road"?
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