One of the biggest insurance companies in the world held a party for salesmen where they were rewarded with the services of prostitutes.

Munich Re is the world's biggest re-insurer - in other words, the company acts as an insurance company for other insurance companies.

One of its divisions, Ergo, told the BBC it had held the party to reward salesmen in 2007.

A spokesman said the people who organised it had since left.

The gathering was held at a thermal baths in the Hungarian capital Budapest as a reward to particularly successful salesmen.

'Whatever they One of the biggest insurance companies in the world held a party for salesmen where they were rewarded with the services of prostitutes.liked'

There were about 100 guests and 20 prostitutes were hired.

A German business newspaper said the prostitutes had worn colour-coded arm-bands designating their availability, and the women had their arms stamped after each service rendered.

According to Handelsblatt, quoting an unnamed participant, guests were able to take the women to four-poster beds at the spa "and do whatever they liked".

"After each such encounter the women were stamped on the lower arm in order to keep track of how often each woman was frequented," the paper quoted the man as saying.

"The women wore red and yellow wrist bands. One lot were hostesses, the others would fulfil your every wish.

"There were also women with white wrist bands. They were reserved for board members and the very best sales reps."

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One of the biggest insurance companies in the world held a party for salesmen where they were rewarded with the services of prostitutes.

Is the above fine?

The company held a party.

The conjunction where should refer to a place. Here it refers to the party.

I don't know how it fits here.

Please tell me.

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1.I had/held a party to some of my friends in which I served whisky. [CORRECT]

2.I had/held a party to some of my friends where I served whisky. [THIS IS NOT CORRECT.]

3. I had/held a party to some of my friends in a remote place where serenity prevailed. [FINE]
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Rotter One of the biggest insurance companies in the world held a party for salesmen, where they were rewarded with the services of prostitutes.
Is the above fine? yes

The company held a party.

The conjunction where should refer to a place. Here it refers to the party. But the party had to be held somewhere, so "where" refers to that place.

1.I had/held a party for some of my friends, in which I served whisky. [CORRECT] I wouldn't say that. We say 'at a party', not 'in a party'. So if you want to use "which", say 'at which' or 'during which'.

2.I had/held a party for some of my friends, where I served whisky. [THIS IS NOT CORRECT.] It is correct, as noted above.

3. I had/held a party for some of my friends in a remote place where serenity prevailed. [FINE] yes

Thanks Canadian45 for the reply.

What is wrong with to say I held/gave a party to some of my friends.

Should it strictly be 'party for' ?

I found the following sentence in an online dictionary.

The university threw a party to welcome them [ DO YOU DISAGREE WITH THEM?]

1.I had/held a party for some of my friends, at which I served whisky. [CORRECT]

1.I had/held a party for some of my friends, during which I served whisky. [CORRECT]

I know we say I met her/him at a party. We don't say I met him/her in a party.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Rotter
What is wrong with saying I held/gave a party to some of my friends. You can give a gift to your friend, but you don't give a party to your friend.
Should it strictly be 'party for' ? yes

I found the following sentence in an online dictionary.
The university threw a party to welcome them [ DO YOU DISAGREE WITH THEM?] I am not sure what you are asking about "them", but ''threw a party to welcome them" [Y] is very different from ''held a party to (some of) my friends" [N].

RotterI had/held a party to some of my friends
You hold a party for (someone).

Generally speaking, anything you do that benefits someone else you do for them, e.g., He helped her carry all those packages. It was nice of him to do that for her.

On the other hand, unpleasant or nasty things are done to someone, e.g., She slapped him in the face. I can't believe she did that to him.

CJ
RotterI had/held a party ... where I served whisky.
This is correct. A party, or any other gathering that can be attended, may be considered a place and therefore take the relative word where.

I attended a concert where I heard a symphony by Mahler.

A friend of mine once went to a wedding where he was served whisky.

Have you ever heard of a dinner where they only served blue food?

CJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
RotterThe university threw a party to welcome them
You can add an infinitive clause to just about any sentence to show purpose, that is, to show why.

We had a meeting. Why? To discuss the problem.

So, We had a meeting to discuss the problem. (The purpose was to discuss the problem.)

But the infinitive of purpose is separate from the for-phrase that shows who benefits. You can have one or the other or both or neither in a sentence. (Most of the time you don't have both.)

The university threw a party.

The university threw a party for them. (They received the benefit.)

The university threw a party to welcome them. (The purpose was to welcome them.)

The university threw a party for them to welcome them. (Both the benefit phrase and the infinitive clause.)

Here's another.

The company held an awards ceremony.

The company held an awards ceremony for the employees.

The company held an awards ceremony to thank the employees.

The company held an awards ceremony for the employees to thank them.

CJ
RotterThe university threw a party to welcome them
The university (did something) in order TO (do something else). In this example, in order to is shortened to to.
I thank Canadian45, CJ and Compile for the excellent replies.

1.I bought a present to my girlfriend for her birthday.

2.I bought a present for my girlfriend for her birthday.

3. I bought a present to my girlfriend on her birthday.

[ I did bought a present some months ago.]

Are the 3 sentences fine?

My insntinctive reaction is that you buy something to her/him.

After all you have money to buy something.

You might think otherwise.
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