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According to a grammar rule, the article "a/an" in the wording of
[so/as/too/how/however + adj. + a/an + sing. count noun]
should be placed after the adjective and before the noun as in examples 1 and 2.

ex1) How cute a puppy it is!
ex2) He is so cute a boy that everyone likes him.

If there are two adjectives or more in this type of wording, where would you like to put the article? I'd put it before the noun as in the following examples. Do you agree?

ex3) He is too tall and stout a man for you to challenge.
ex4) She is so cute, smart, pretty, and sexy a girl that every boy makes a pass at her.
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Absolutely, Komountain. Well done.

And I'd like to meet the girl in (4).
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Hi Ko-San sanEmotion: big smile

I also find 'SUCH' and 'SO' difficult to use. May I throw my two cents' worth?

I) When the noun is with 'a' (countable in singular form), you can use both of 'SUCH' and 'SO'.
1) I didn't realize that he was such a big fool. [such+a+ADJ+NOUN]
2) I didn't realize that he was so big a fool. [so+ADJ+a+NOUN]
I personally feel the expression (1) more natural/colloquial.

II) When the noun is without 'a' (uncountable or countable in plural form) you can use only 'SUCH'.
3) I didn't realize that they were such big fools.
NOT) I didn't realize that they were so big fools.

paco
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I have two more questions relevant to the original one.

First of all, let's take a look at the following sentence.

(1)"He is so cute a boy that everyone likes him." (The article "a" is required.)

Here, if the word 'boy' takes a plural form the sentence will be:

(2)"They are so cute boys that everyone likes them." (The article "a" is gone.)

Then, (2) can, I believe, be paraphrased to read:

(3)"They are such cute boys that everyone likes them." ("so" was replaced with "such.")

My questions:
a. Do you have any preference of choosing singular nouns over plural ones in the "so -- that --" pattern as shown (1) and (2)?

b. Do (2) and (3) really have the same meaning? If not, what's the difference?

Thanks.
 paco2004's reply was promoted to an answer.
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I agree. Paco. The two structures are not so closely related, and another way of organizing is might be:

(1)

So + adjective + a/an + countable noun
'He is so big a fool that I cannot abide him.'

(2)

Such + a/an + (adjective) + countable singular noun
'He is such a (big) fool that I cannot abide him.'

Such + (adjective) + plural noun
'They are such (big) fools that I cannot abide them'.

Such + adjective + uncountable noun (the adjective seems to be required in this case)
'It is such sweet tapioca that I cannot eat it'.