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for example, in the sentence, "Some regard Jim Thorpe, an Oklahoma Indian, as the greatest all-around athlete America has yet produced."

it asks to find the adjectives within the sentence. The issue I'm having right now is when I come across multiple words that I believe are adjectives modifying a noun. However, I think "greatest all-around" modifies athlete, but from my understanding compound adjectives are hypenated, and I don't see greatest hypenated.

I guess the bigger question is, when you find a lot of ajectives in from of a noun or compound noun, what do you do?

Finally, what are all the adjectives for the above sentence? I get: Oklahoma -> Indian, greatest all-around -> althlete.
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Hi,

for example, in the sentence, "Some regard Jim Thorpe, an Oklahoma Indian, as the greatest all-around athlete America has yet produced."

You have correctly identified the words that are being used as adjectives in your sentence.

What other task are you actually trying to accomplish here?



Best wishes, Clive

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Greatest is an adjective by itself. It is a superlative.
We often use hypens between two or more words to make a single-word adjective.

The sweet-smelling roses are in the vase.

Some people see the world through rose-colored glasses
She's a good-hearted woman

Republicans want a lean-and-mean government.
[EDIT] Clive is correct that the hypenated words have to connect to each other in meaning. Example: She's a dark-skinned well-meaning good-hearted Christian woman.
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the exercise was to simply write down the adjectives. so what exactly is the deal with hyphenated adjectives? why isn't greatest included with all-around?
Hi,

so what exactly is the deal with hyphenated adjectives? why isn't greatest included with all-around?

Some adjectives consist of a hyphenated phrase, eg all-around, nice-looking, blue-eyed.

Just because a hypenated adjective is used, it doesn't mean that every other adjective has to be attached to it by hyphens.

eg we say 'a tall blue-eyed man', but not 'a tall-blue-eyed man'.

Best wishes, Clive
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 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.