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"Often they would invite each other over to each other’s houses on the weekend so that they could play with other kids in the neighborhood, ride their bicycles, or play basketball."

This sentence is rather long. If I want to pause when I read the sentence, are the following pauses okay?

(Each pause is expressed by a slash.)

"Often they would invite each other / over to each other’s houses on the weekend / so that they could play with other kids in the neighborhood, ride their bicycles, or play basketball."

Invite over is a phrasal verb. Therefore, is it natural to pause between over and to (i.e., Often they would invite each other over / to each other’s houses)?

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Often they would invite each other over to each other’s houses on the weekend so that they could play with other kids in the neighbouhood, ride their bicycles, or play basketball."


"Often they would invite each other over to each other’s houses . . .

This is not wrong, but it's awkward. More natural is to reword, eg Often they would visit each other's houses . .


This sentence is rather long. If I want to pause when I read the sentence, are the following pauses okay?

(Each pause is expressed by a slash.)

"Often they would invite each other / over to each other’s houses on the weekend / so that they could play with other kids in the neighbourhood, ride their bicycles, or play basketball."

I'd say it this way. Often they would invite each other over to each other’s houses on the weekend / so that they could play with other kids in the neighbourhood / ride their bicycles / or play basketball."


The pause after the weekend helps the listener to grasp this long sentence.'.


Invite over is a phrasal verb. Therefore, is it natural to pause between over and to (i.e., Often they would invite each other over / to each other’s houses)? No, it's not natural.


Clive

Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
SnappyThis sentence is rather long.

Commas are not pauses. They are an aid to reading. If you toss in commas wherever you feel like, the reader will be distracted, thinking that there is a reason for the comma. If a sentence is too long, end it and start a new one:

"Often they would invite each other over on the weekend. That way, they could play with other kids in the neighborhood, ride their bicycles together, or play basketball."

But the original sentence is not very long, not long enough to worry about.

I agree that you shouldn't toss in commas wherever you feels like it. However, I find that relating commas to speech helps learners to better understand the use of commas in writing. It can save them from going down the rabbit hole of arbitrary-seeming comma rules. S \

Definition of pause

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a temporary stop 2a : a break in a verse b : a brief suspension of the voice to indicate the limits and relations of sentences and their parts 3 : temporary inaction especially as caused by uncertainty : hesitation 4a : the sign denoting a fermata b : a mark (such as a period or comma) used in writing or printing to indicate or correspond to a pause of voice

Cite this Entry

“Pause.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pause . Accessed 9 May. 2021.


Clive

Snappy Where to pause in a sentence?

There are tons of videos online on this topic.

See https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=esl+thought+groups

CJ

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

Thanks. Some non-native speakers (Japanese people) think that the sentence is very long.