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Hi everyone.

Could you tell me whether the word "whereever" is a conjunction or adverb in the sentences below?

Is it your conclusion that the word "jung" whereever it's used means the same?

I will follow you whereever you go.

Thanks

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Two choices:


In traditional grammar and most dictionaries: adverb

In the best of modern grammars: preposition

Comments  

Hi Silak

'Wherever' is a pronoun - to be exact, a complex relative pronoun. It stands in for any number of nouns and means 'within context, any place noun you choose will fit my meaning'

- The beginning, the end, the middle of the sentence, wherever, 'jung' means the same to me

- Paris, Berlin, London, wherever you go, I'll follow

(There's only one 'e' in the middle)

Dave

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 BillJ's reply was promoted to an answer.

I'll support Bill on that:

- I'll go wherever I choose

That looks like 'to any place' - so it is modifying 'go', like an adverb

Dave

Could you please explain how "wherever" is a preposition?

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silak12

Could you please explain how "wherever" is a preposition?

It has a spatial meaning like many prepositions. For example "I'll take you wherever you want to go" = "I'll take you to any place you want to go".

This dictionary shows it as a preposition: https://simple.wiktionary.org/wiki/wherever

Hi

I don't think that 'wherever' can act purely as a preposition. Maybe the idea there is that, in some sentences, 'wherever' doesn't usually take a preposition

- He was born in London.

- He was born wherever.

[wherever = pronoun or adjective but, for some reason, it doesn't need a preposition]

Dave

dave_anon

Hi

I don't think that 'wherever' can act purely as a preposition. Maybe the idea there is that, in some sentences, 'wherever' doesn't usually take a preposition

- He was born in London.

- He was born wherever.

[wherever = pronoun or adjective but, for some reason, it doesn't need a preposition]

Dave

"Wherever" is not a pronoun or adjective in any competent grammar. Traditional grammar has it as an adverb.

One modern grammar reclassifies such words as prepositions for reasons that are quite complex, But it is clear that "where/wherever" can have a special location meaning similar to prepositions (where are you? ~ at what place?; where are you going? ~ to what place?). Consider also the somewhat archaic whereof, whereto, wherefrom etc. where the second element in each case is a preposition.

Where(ever) typically occurs in fused relative constructions, though only in the 'free choice' kind e.g. Liz can go [where(ever) she wants], which can be glossed as Liz can go to any place she wants.


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Hi

To persuade me that 'wherever' is a preposition, you're going to have demonstrate it in a sentence in which a preposition would typically be used:

- I'm going to London

- I'm going wherever London

I'm not persuaded yet

Dave :-)