I don't know whether we should use the definite article in the following sentence. Are there any native English speakers who can answer the question? If both can do, what's the difference here? Thanks.

1.Roses in this garden are beautiful.

2.The roses in this garden are beautiful.
1 2 3
Hello, Valida-- and welcome to English Forums.

2.The roses in this garden are beautiful.-- Because you have specified 'in this garden', the definite article is needed.
Hi valida:

Welcome to the Forums!
valida1.Roses in this garden are beautiful.
2.The roses in this garden are beautiful.
You can use either one.
The first sentence is a more general statement; referring to roses in general. It could be in this context:

Here is a lovely English garden. It has daffodils, sweet william, petunias, marigolds and roses. Roses in this garden are especially beautiful in the summertime. (The second is much more common - in general, we would see the definite article used.)

The second sentence refers to very specific roses -
The roses in this garden are beautiful. The roses across the lane have a fungal infestation and are stunted and ugly.
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Thank you for your reply.

I've seen a thesis that argues that both 1 and 2 are correct there. May I ask to what extent do you find the first sentence wrong? Are there any possible interpretation for the first sentence without the definite article?

Some more related questions here.

3. Wines of France are among the best in the world.

4. The wines of France are among the best in the world.

5. Wines that France produces are among the best in the world.

6. The wines that France produces are among the best in the world.

Do we have to use the definite article in 4 (cf.3) and in 6 (cf.5)? I do not mean to say that one sentence is wrong as opposed to the other one. I wonder which is correct or perhaps both can be correct ones for slightly different interpretations.
Thanks a lot.

One more related question.

Do you think the first sentence can refer to some of the roses in this garden while the second refers to all the roses in this garden?
validaDo you think the first sentence can refer to some of the roses in this garden while the second refers to all the roses in this garden?
I don't get that impression at all. You have to use a quantifier or qualifying adjective if you don't mean all of them.

The hybrid tea roses are beautiful.
Some of the roses are beautiful.
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thank you, AlpheccaStars.

Can you help me answer the above questions about (the)wines of France/that France produces.
valida3. Wines of France are among the best in the world.
4. The wines of France are among the best in the world.
5. Wines that France produces are among the best in the world.
6. The wines that France produces are among the best in the world.
It is arguable that any of these are OK.
However, I think you would see them more often written with the definite article.

I would naturally say this without the definite articles:
When dining out, I always choose French wines over German wines.
My two cents.

These are fine as isolated sentences.

The roses in this garden are beautiful.
The wines of France are among the best in the world.
The wines that France produces are among the best in the world.
_______________

These don't work as isolated sentences. Either they need to be modified or they need to be placed within a larger context, as shown below.

*Roses in this garden are beautiful.
*Wines of France are among the best in the world.
*Wines that France produces are among the best in the world.
____

Roses in this garden would be beautiful. (Placing roses in this garden would create a beautiful effect.)
I wonder if roses in this garden would be beautiful. [Same reasoning.]

?If (you think) roses in this garden are beautiful, you should see what lilies can do. (If the presence of roses in this garden creates a beautiful effect, ...)

French wines are among the best in the world. [I have no idea why this rephrasing works without the. It has something to do with determiners, and possibly with proper nouns and adjectives.]
?French-produced wines are among the best in the world. [OK, but still not quite right.]

I find it harder to contextualize the French wines than the roses! I'll have to think about this some more. Emotion: smile

CJ
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