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are the following question grammatically correct

1 how many degrees are (there) in a right angle?
2 what continent is canada a part of/on
3 every how many years are the olympics (held)
4 what country has the biggest population
5 how many planets are (there) in the solar system
6 whats the population of the world approximately
7 how many weeks are (there) in a year

8 what is that referred to as/what is that referred as?
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If you want to write grammatically correct English, alc24, you cannot neglect proper punctuation and capitalization. That is an extremely bad habit to get into.

I have made corrections and comments inside the quote:
alc24Are the following questions grammatically correct?

1. How many degrees are (there) in a right angle?
2. What continent is Canada a part of/on? / What continent is Canada on?
3. Every how many years are the olympics (held)?
4. What country has the biggest population?
5. How many planets are (there) in the solar system?
6. What's the population of the world approximately?
7. How many weeks are (there) in a year?

8. What is that referred to as? --> This basically means "What is that called?"

What is was that referred as? --> The meaning this suggests to me is the following:
What is the special name you assigned to X when you referred/sent it to me?

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for the first one

can it either be

how many drgrees are there in a right angle? can you leave out the THERE
YankeeIf you want to write grammatically correct English, alc24, you cannot neglect proper punctuation and capitalization. That is an extremely bad habit to get into.
Not only is is a bad habit, but correct punctuation is part of correct grammar. None of the sentences are acceptable in formal writing, since none of them have proper punctuation.

e.e. cummings can be excused, since his poetry was also a visual art form.

Cheers,
A-Emotion: stars
alc24for the first one

can it either be

how many drgrees are there in a right angle? can you leave out the THERE

Yes, you can omit "there," but you cannot omit the punctuation.

Regards,
A-Emotion: stars
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thank you very much for the help , i just had 6 more quick question if you can help

what's the difference between

1 I saved you money by grounding you / I got you to save money by grounding you

2 We've been walking in circles for the past hour, I've already seen this house twice

3 This blue is the same one i had/This blue (color) is the same one as the one i had

4 You need to live what I've lived to realize/You need to experience what I've experienced to realize...

5 There have/has to be at least some normal people in here

There have/has to be reasons, in order for there to be anything of value

6 You won’t get as good a price if you go through him as you would if you went through her

If you go through him you won’t get as good a price as you would if you went through (this sentence is weird, how would you say it, are they correct??)

7 You can continue watching the movie for the time it takes me to finish my drink, then we have to go

8 I did the dishes for the time it takes for the song to finish/I did the dishes in the time it takes for the song to finish thank you

you'd be of great help if you took a look

thanks
I have replied to these last on another thread, Alc. Please do not double-post.
sorry about that

there was just one

1 I saved you money by grounding you / I got you to save money by grounding you

where are you from Mister Micawber ?

al
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I saved you money by grounding you-- I saved it

I got you to save money by grounding you -- You saved it.